Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach’

Boreas Inn named 2009 "Top 5 B&B" in KING 5 TV's "Northwest Best Escapes"

May 5th, 2009 by Susie Goldsmith

Thank you for picking Boreas Inn on KING 5 TV’s Northwest Best Escapes as one of the “Top 5″ Bed and Breakfasts!  We are thrilled to be among the winning group and know that without our guests’ wonderful reviews and votes, that we would not be named with such worthy inns.  This is a great reward and knowing that we are appreciated is truly the best thanks we could have, other than a fully occupied inn!  Come visit and help us celebrate being a Long Beach, Washington Best Escape!   Adding to the KING 5 “Northwest Best Escapes” awards, Long Beach was voted “BEST BEACH” and the Boardwalk in Long Beach was voted “Best Place to Kiss”. The North Head Lighthouse was voted #2 “Best Lighthouse” and the Cape Disappointment Lighthouse was voted #3 “Best Lighthouse”.    So in summary, Boreas is on the Best Beach and five blocks from the “Best Place to Kiss” and 10 minutes from two of the best lighthouses!  How cool is that?  Thank you to KING 5!

Orchids in the Inn

February 27th, 2009 by Susie Goldsmith

Orchids in The Stargazer
Orchids in The Stargazer

Winter Wonderland Enough Already!

December 22nd, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

Through the ornaments to the west gardens and ocean beyond.

Through the ornaments to the west gardens and ocean beyond.

The Garden Suite gardens blanketed in snow

The Garden Suite gardens blanketed in snow.

I think images will say much more than words.  We have had a series of spectacular storms–most unusual for this part of the Pacific Northwest.

Normal if You Live In Alaska!

Normal if You Live In Alaska!

Annual Peninsula Event, "Ocian in View", November 7-9

October 14th, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

Here is a press release about the upcoming annual “Ocian in View” weekend., November 7-9 on the Long Beach Peninsula.   If you haven’t attended this event in the past, consider coming to Long Beach to attend.  It looks fascinating as always!

From Hand-Carved Canoes to Columbia Condors, ‘Ocian In View’ Drifts Deftly Between The Past And The Present

LONG BEACH PENINSULA, Wash. – September 2008 – History buffs and cultural connoisseurs won’t want to miss this year’s ‘Ocian in View,’ an absorbing look at the Long Beach Peninsula’s provocative past. Slated for November 7, 8 and 9, 2008, the series of special events combines presentations by area experts with interpretive tours, educational programs and annual gatherings celebrating the Peninsula’s unique heritage.

With its diverse natural gifts and strategic seaside setting, the Long Beach Peninsula has lured explorers throughout the centuries. “‘Ocian in View’ answers some of the questions about why people live here at the edge of the continent, on a little bit of land where the irresistible force of the Columbia River slams into the immovable Pacific Ocean,” said Washington State Historical Society tour guide and lifelong local resident Jim Sayce. “Looking back in time allows for thoughtful and engaged commentary on what the area must have looked like to visitors in the late 18th century.”

Launching the ‘Ocian in View’ festivities on Nov. 7, Chinook Indian Tribe chairman Ray Gardner will illuminate the past with his talk called “The Finest Canoes: The Chinook Canoe and its Role in Traditional Culture.” The lecture will start at 7 p.m. at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco. Tickets will cost $10 per person, sold at the door, with first-come first-served seating.

On Nov. 8, participants can hop aboard a bus and retrace the explorations of Euro-American sailors before the days of Lewis and Clark. Called “Land in View,” the modern-day adventure will be led by Sayce, sharing a wealth of tales about the captains and crews who ventured across unforgiving seas in search of the Northwest Passage. Departing from the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum at 9 a.m. and again at 1 p.m., each tour costs $30 per person. Reservations should be made early for this unforgettable three-hour trip by calling 360.642.3446.

Other highlights of ‘Ocian in View’ include the following:

  • On Nov. 8, participants can treat themselves to a savory combination of hot cider and history during the 11th annual November on the North Shore,” a free Open House at the Knappton Cove Heritage Center. Guided walks will take place from 1 p.m.-4 p.m. at the historic site – formerly a U.S. Public Health Quarantine Station Hospital – located 3 miles east of the north end of the Astoria-Megler Bridge. For information, call 503.738.5206.
  • Nov. 8 serves as the date of the Chinook Tribe Seafood Dinner, a bounty of regional seafood, salad, Indian fry bread, dessert and beverages. Prepared by Chinook tribe members, the meal will cost $15 per adult, $13 for seniors (ages 55 and older) and $5 for children under 12. Diners can join the fun from 4 p.m.-7 p.m. at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum. No reservations are required.
  • Also on Nov. 8, naturalist/author/teacher Jack Nisbet will impart his vast knowledge of David Douglas, a trailblazing 19th-century London Horticultural Society botanist. Douglas made three visits to the Pacific Northwest between 1825 and 1833, and his remarkable acquisitions provided a unique look at regional plants and animals during the period of contact. The lecture is scheduled for 7 p.m. in Ilwaco’s Hilltop Auditorium. Admission will be $10 per person.
  • Nov. 9 heralds the dedication of a California condor sculpture crafted by nationally known artist Bart Kenworthy. A life-sized replica with a 9-foot wingspan, the bronze sculpture has been erected as a tribute to the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which found a ‘vulture of the large kind’ in 1805. The condor is posed on the ribs of a whale, with both creatures attached to a basalt rock weighing 40,000 pounds. The free ceremony begins at noon at the Port of Ilwaco’s covered pavilion.

  • On Nov. 9, condors continue to command attention during “Columbia Condors: Forgotten Giants in the Sky,” a free lecture by Oregon Zoo Research Associate David Moen. Through the Condor Recovery Program, the Oregon Zoo is involved with captive breeding of the bird, once nearly extinct and now an integral part of the natural and cultural history of the Pacific Northwest. Moen will share his insights at 1 p.m. at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum.
  • Throughout Nov. 9, the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center will welcome guests to a memorable Open House. Coffee, juice and cake will be served at the center, where extensive exhibits spotlight the landmark 19th-century Corps of Discovery Expedition. The free event will run from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Cape Disappointment State Park.

  • In addition, Nov. 9 features the dedication of a large-scale replica of the United States Mint nickel, created to honor the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial in 2005. Photographer Andrew E. Cier – whose photograph inspired the nickel’s design – will attend the free ceremony, held at 3:30 p.m. at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center.

‘Ocian in View’ is presented by a partnership of community non-profit organizations, led by the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum and the Pacific County Friends of Lewis and Clark. For general program and destination information, please call the Long Beach Peninsula Visitors Bureau at 1.800.451.2542 or access the Peninsula’s website at www.funbeach.com.

Dragon Sky at Boreas

October 6th, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

It was a stormy day this Saturday and in the afternoon, the skies cleared and these spectacular clouds appeared on the horizon.  At first, they were two alligator-like heads, then the wind flattened out the southerly head and turned it into a whipping tail.  We hadn’t seen anything like it before–so we snapped a shot off our top deck.  What an entertaining and beautifully colored sunset it was. The image doesn’t do it justice!The alligator sunset made our day!

Boreas Inn's Wild Mushroom Celebration is Coming Up!

August 25th, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

The Kite Festival for 2008 has come and gone. We had a super mellow week with wonderful guests, most of whom have been coming here for close to a decade. Visiting with their families and friends who dropped by was great fun.Flying Penguins The weather was fabulous the last three days and on sunny Saturday we spent a few idyllic hours with friends on the warm beach in front of the inn and I snapped some pictures. I loved the gigantic penguin kite!

Now we look forward to Boreas’ 2008 Wild Mushroom Celebration to be held October 17-19. I finally bought a little Flip Video camcorder and when Veronica Williams, our “All Wild” forager showed up with some spectacular Wild Lobster Mushrooms, it seemed like a good time to film my first-ever video! I have uploaded it to YouTube and will try to upload it here! Excuse the wobbliness–I’m a newbie.

Autumn is the Time for Clamming

August 11th, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

Kite Festival at Long Beach

August 11th, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

We Lost a Loved One

May 22nd, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

If you’re in this business long enough, it is inevitable that you will fall in love with some of your guests.
It is also inevitable that considering the thousands of guests we have gracing our inn, that some will pass on.
In the last 14 months, this has happened to us twice.
Both these women died way before their “sell by” dates–one in her 40′s and one in her very early 60′s.
Too young!!
Fred and Margaret came to us 10 years ago. They walked in off the street on a busy August day, with the NO VACANCY sign hanging outside. “We want to stay here. Do you really have no vacancies?” they asked.

I had forgotten to take the NO VACANCY sign down that morning after clearing out part of a full house.
Yes, we had a room for Fred and Margaret.
Thank goodness. They stayed at Boreas for three nights and a long-standing friendship was begun.
We’ve met the kids–we know the family well. Fred and Margaret have come for “Kite Festivus” as Fred calls it, nearly every year.
We all fell in love.
Fred and Margaret started coming each Valentine’s Day for three nights. They met other guests here and would rendezvous with them for Valentine’s Day. Very sweet.
This Valentine’s Day, Fred had to cancel.
Margaret was ill; it sounded bad.
She was diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer and it was just too late for treatment.
She was just too ill.
Margaret died Tuesday morning, the 20th of May at 7:15 in the morning.
Way too fast–we were hoping to get to Puyallup to say goodbye. So we are saying goodbye from Boreas.
Fred is coming back for “Kite Festivus” this August, by himself. He may be joined by his daughter, Sarah.
Our other guest, Odell, who lost his young wife, Linda, in April of 2007, comes back by himself.
Boreas is a good place to be by yourself. But Margaret and Linda will always be with us.
We don’t mean that in a trite way.
We truly hold them in our hearts.
Really getting to know and love our guests is what makes our lives rich.
We certainly aren’t doing this for the big bucks! :-)
We will miss, you Margaret, and promise to take good care of Fred.
If you can’t be with the one you loved, love the ones you’re with!
That’s us!Cosmos and the Reflecting Ball on the Dunes Deck

Long Beach, Washington's Warm Weather Welcomes The Hawaiian Chieftain and The Lady Washington

May 16th, 2008 by Susie Goldsmith

It is currently 83 degrees in Long Beach and these beautiful tall ships are moored at the Port of Ilwaco this weekend. You can take tours, go on an adventure cruise or just gaze at these majestic ships! Saturday Market along the waterfront has begun and there are more merchants than ever. We have transitioned from winter to summer in only a few days ‘time and we can’t complain. Come and visit!

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