Posts Tagged ‘Boreas Bed and Breakfast’

Wild Mushrooms Will Be Celebrated October 19-21, 2012 at Boreas Inn!

October 4th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

We are concerned about the lack of rain in the Pacific Northwest because with the rains come the beautiful, plentiful wild mushrooms.  Only a couple of tenths of rain have fallen, mostly as mist, since mid-July.  The chanterelle season, in and around the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula, was surprisingly good in spite of the dry weather.  But come rain or shine, we will be celebrating the Wild Mushroom  from October 19-21 for the 11th year of Boreas Inn’s Annual Wild Mushroom Celebration!  Veronica Williams, our “All Wild” professional forager will be available to take our guests foraging on Saturday the 20th.  She will also host a discussion in the Boreas living room that is open to the public on Sunday the 21st. She always brings dehydrated wild mushrooms to sell along with her Wild Mushroom cookbook. Please call if you’re planning on attending the very informal discussion at 11 a.m. on Sunday, the 20th!

Though we were booked up for this event for over six months, we had a cancellation, and the beautiful Pacifica guest room is open for this extra-special weekend.  $590 for two people includes 2 nights at Boreas, 2 lavish breakfasts including our five-course Wild Mushroom Celebration Brunch with Veronica on Sunday,  a five-course Wild Mushroom and matching Washington Wine dinner for two (with the celebration group!) at Pelicano Restaurant on the Port, all taxes and restaurant gratuity are also included.  Add an extra night at our $150 “Walk-in Rate”!  (Most of the guests have added a Thursday night to their weekend!) Mushroom foraging with Veronica on Saturday, the 20th, is $45 pp.  Call today to get our last room for this relaxing celebration of the wild mushroom extravaganza! This special is not listed on our reservation site, so if you book online, ask for the Wild Mushroom Celebration in your note to us and we will adjust your reservation for you!

Wild Mushrooms abound around the Long Beach Washington Peninsula!

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day with Guests and Friends of Boreas Inn, Long Beach, Washington

June 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

It is the unexpected brilliant sunny days when the forecast is semi-dreary that make living on the Long Beach Washington Peninsula so interesting and wonderful.  We chose today to have a Puppy and Pizza Celebration at Cape Disappointment State Park at Waikiki Beach’s Serious Pizza with our friend and long-time guest Odell Hathaway, who has a new therapy/assistance dog, Phoenix.  Boreas Inn welcomes assistance dogs and we are getting to know Phoenix, the puppy, who will within two years, be a fully trained assistance dog. Odell has a couple of health issues that have the potential to require Phoenix’s help.  In the meanwhile, this puppy, who Odell found through Oregon Assistance Dogs, is a gem of a baby golden retriever. At 15 pounds, she is a bundle of love and she is oh so soft and sweet.  Odell is very lucky to have found her and for a dog, you could do far worse than have Odell as a parent! Phoenix will have all the best of everything, including fine parenting!  We invited Skyler and Allen from Tangly Cottage Gardening and Jessica and Chris Miller to the celebration. They are our dear friends who know Odell from his many trips to Boreas.  We ate world-class pizza at Serious Pizza–many pizza’s as a matter of fact!  Jim and Chi make the best cherry and apple wood-fired pizza on the planet and we sampled four different pizza’s at the park.  So it was a perfect day at the best park in Washington State, eating the best pizza at Serious Pizza with some of the best folks we know!

A Pooped Puppy at our Serious Pizza Party on June 2

Sunny Days This Weekend–Great for Clamming!

March 22nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Clamming at Beard's Hollow

This weekend looks to be lovely with sunshine!  The Long Beach Peninsula has early morning clam tides Saturday and Sunday so you can limit and be back in time for a warm hot tub and our signature breakfast by the fireplace at 9:30.  All of our friends have reported limiting quickly during the last clam dig–so maybe you can too!  Of course,  you don’t have to dig clams –or else send the sweetheart out to dig clams while you sleep in could be a plan too! Simply languishing in Boreas Inn’s fluffy feather beds in our oceanside Long Beach, WA lodging will make your weekend divine. We will set up dinners out in our favorite haunts.  Whether you clam or not, you will dig it at Boreas!

Spring Whale Watching on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula

February 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling, they say it’s the longest migration of  any mammal up to .

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling.

This extensive gray whale migration all the way to Baja for such a brief stay reminds me of our several family trips during spring vacation when we would drive from Lake Oswego, near Portland all the way to Ensenada, in Baja California.  It’s a long drive in a station wagon with parents and two domineering older brothers for a very brief stay in Baja.  Of course, stopping at Disneyland and in San Diego were nice distractions away from the back seat of a Plymouth station wagon.  We’d spend a few days in Baja and then turn around and drive back to Portland.  Our family migration from Portland to Baja does have a vague but humorous similarity to the gray whales’.  The gray whales tend to breed and nurse their youngsters while in the warmer waters which certainly was not our goal while in Baja.

Our favorite place to watch for the gray whales is in Cape Disappointment State Park at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center and the North Head Lighthouse.  From December until early February, we have seen the grays migrating south and then again in March, April and May when they return to the arctic.  That being said, we have seen gray whales in September just off the surf line from the stunning turnout on the Loop 100 in Cape D State Park.  There are some “permanent” gray whales living off the Washington Coast.  Just over a month ago a half dozen gigantic blue whales were spotted not far off the Long Beach Peninsula, perhaps 30 miles.  They were over 100 feet long!  Fishermen report in one day of summer fishing, seeing three or four varieties of whales including sperm whales and humpbacks or “humpies” off our coast.

Grays feed mostly on crustaceans which it eats by turning on its side (usually the right, resulting in loss of eyesight in the right eye for many older animals) and it scoops up sediments from the sea floor.  They eat by using their baleens which act like a sieve, to capture small sea animals, taken in along with sand, water and other materials they scoop up.  They feed in arctic waters during the summer and sometimes feed during its migration but mostly, when heading south, they rely on their fat reserves.  We have seen them seemingly rubbing themselves on the North Jetty near our favorite spot in the Cape D State Park.   They were feeding by scraping the rocks on the jetty.  So cool!

During migration, these giant cruisers average around 75 miles per day at an average speed of 5 mph.  The round trip of 9,900–14,000 miles is supposedly the longest annual migration of any mammal.  By late December to early January, they begin to arrive in the calving lagoons of Baja. Gestation for grays is 13.5 months so often mothers give birth in the safer waters of Baja and single females are seeking mates.  By mid-February to mid-March the whales have arrived in the lagoons and are nursing, calving and mating.

Throughout February and March, the first to leave the lagoons are males and females without new calves. Pregnant females and nursing mothers with their newborns are the last to depart, leaving only when their calves are ready for the journey, which is usually from late March to mid-April. Sometimes the mothers with new calves linger in warm waters into May.

A population of about 200 gray whales stay along the eastern Pacific coast from Canada to California throughout the summer which is why we occasionally see them in non-migration months.  They never leave to go to Alaskan waters. This summer resident group is known as the Pacific Coast Feeding Group.

Now that you know all about gray whales, drive to the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula to try to get a glimpse.  Right now you might see a few stragglers heading south and in a month or so you will see the gray whales returning from their brief stay in the warmer waters off the Baja Peninsula.  At Boreas Inn, we always have binoculars for you to borrow and helpful hints (Bill is great at spotting whales). During the busier times of migration, there are experts at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Cape D. State Park, just 10 minutes from Boreas Inn.

This is a perfect time of year to take your Valentine to the beach to watch for whales and sleep in the Boreas Inn’s lovely beds, dine by the fire on the best three-course B&B breakfast you’ve ever had, breathe the cool ocean breezes, be lulled by the gentle sound of the Pacific Ocean lapping on the beach and to relax.  Let your innkeepers, Susie Goldsmith and Bill Verner design your time away with great dinners at The Depot, Pelicano, the 42nd Street Cafe, The Lost Roo and Shelburne’s dining room and maybe an in-room massage!  Check our online specials or give us a call at 888-642-8069. We hope to see you soon!

 

 

Happy New Years’ Weekend–Fireworks, Crab Cakes, Champagne and US!

December 29th, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

Come Watch the Fireworks from our Hottub!

Personally, New Years’ Eve isn’t my favorite holiday.  I think of doing taxes, of what I haven’t accomplished this year, what I need to accomplish next year… but every year, our guests jolly me into appreciating the holiday more than I would were we not innkeepers. After all, 2012 sounds more well-rounded than 2011.  I like even numbers. THERE WILL BE FIREWORKS at the beach, in view from Boreas, on New Years Eve!! I almost forgot!

The Christmas tree is still fresh and lovely for some reason (Bill takes good care of the tree!) and we haven’t tired of the decorations so prettily placed by our decorating crew the first weekend in December. We had a great time decorating this year. This year was extra special with a sweet blend of family and beloved guests who are now family too. We are hoping that we fill up for New Years’ weekend. We are always filled up after Christmas but not this year! Groupon and Living Social may be the reason—people shopping for bargains.  Frankly, for what Boreas offers, we are a bargain! But we’re offering the Carpe Diem, Walk-in Special rate starting today. $150 for luxury and pampering! Even the cottage is open this weekend.

Our guest list so far is a fun one and Odell will be here to help us dismantle the decorations if we can work around our desire to watch football…at Mark and Helen’s Lost Roo, of course!  Go DUCKS!  Everyone is invited to take DOWN the decorations with us and go to The Roo!

Fresh Dungeness Crabcakes and Champagne on Sunday morning, New Years’ Day, sounds pretty perfect for one of our FOUR courses, and Bill will do beautiful work on the crab cakes as always and I will bake pastries, whip up sauces and make the fruit entrée glow so that consuming all that vitamin C seems very sexy.  Well…it is! But I hope that if it’s going to be cloudy this week end, that it is also stormy so we can feel comforted by the fireplaces.  But I also hope that there is a break in the weather so we can go for a fresh walk to start the New Year. We have been fortunate with fine weather this fall.

Come stay with us this weekend at the prettiest inn on the Long Beach Peninsula—featherbeds, down comforters, fireplaces, fine and fancy breakfast fare, freshly baked brownies, and the incredibly-wonderful-almost-brand-new hot tub for two with a little aromatherapy—mint and eucylptus, to soften your skin. Boreas Bed & Breakfast Inn is posh but hip, fun, but mellow and very food-crazy with a great location on the beach in Long Beach Washington.  Relaxation is the best way to start the next banner year—2012!  Happy New Year!

Cape Disappointment State Park on the Long Beach Peninsula–Our Favorite Place to Visit!

August 13th, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

Bill and I just returned from our brief weekly disappearing act to eat Serious Pizza at Cape Disappointment State Park in Ilwaco on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula.  First of  all, this park is NOT a disappointment–it is our favorite Washington State Park.  It was named “Cape Disappointment” because in 1788, Captain John Meares, a fur trader, was disappointed because this was not the opening to the river–and is, in fact, is located just north of the infamous Mouth of the Columbia River!  Cape Disappointment is also home to the National Park housing Maya Lin’s “Confluence Project” honoring the Indian tribes Lewis and Clark encountered at the confluences of the rivers on their journey west.  Captain Clark and 11 of the “Corps of Discovery” hiked all over the land that is now Cape Disappointment State Park and from McKenzie Head, saw their first panoramic view of the Pacific Ocean!  Then they proceeded to hike north up the Peninsula, right across the property that is now Boreas Inn, located on the 1805 high water mark. So you get to sleep right on the Lewis and Clark Trail!


Of course, one of the most scenic parts of the Park are the two lighthouses, The North Head Lighthouse and the Cape Disappointment Lighthouse.  The North Head is easily explored by parking in the lot and walking down to the lighthouse on a road alongside the rock face overlooking the Pacific Ocean and just north of Benson Beach.  This is a place to linger.  All day.  The waves, huge in the winter but omnipresent, are hypnotic. The color of the water seems to change from blue to green to gray in a storm, but always a stunning contrast with the white tips of the peaks of the waves.  Whale watching from the North Head is often rewarding.  We look for the clumps of kelp offshore and occasionally see the spouts. The pelicans, eagles, many varieties of gulls, terns and a huge array of seabirds make this spot make for some of the best birdwatching in the West. Cape D lighthouse is a hike from the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center (in winter and anytime, the best view of the Mouth of the Columbia and the jetties), around Dead Man’s Cove.  Our guests come from around the world to see these two lighthouses, within miles of Boreas!

I mentioned Serious Pizza!  Well–seriously now, take the combination of a wood-fired pizza oven, burning cherry and apple, the “00 fino” flour imported from Italy, imported cheeses, meats from a great Seattle butcher chop and a location at Waikiki Beach at Cape D (as we call it), and you have not only the recipe for the best wood-fired pizza in Southwest Washington, but a spectacular setting near the amphitheater at Cape D State Park.  With eagles flying overhead (perhaps looking hungrily at your pizza-or maybe at your dog) and osprey circling around with crows and gulls harrassing them, you have an experience you will never forget.  Our favorite pizza is, you guessed it, “The Boreas”–the vegetarian pizza with garlic olive oil base, sundried tomatoes, artichoke hearts, olives and pepperoni.  How special is it to have a pizza named after Boreas Inn?  State Parks built Jim and Chi, the purveyors of this fine pizza, a permanent structure so that visitors to the park, including campers staying in the 240 campsites, can have pizza!  We call ahead to avoid waiting perhaps an hour for the most memorable pizza. It’s truly Neopolitano–a thin delectable crust and just the right amount of cheese for a non-guilt producing light meal.  They also have wood-fired oysters and mouth-watering wood-fired wings.  Homemade ice cream and brownies….oh my!  Watch for Jim and Chi’s Serious Pizza to come soon to the town of Long Beach!

I have attached a very fine video about Cape Disappointment State Park to this blog!  It stars a few of our favorite State Park employees and some of the best scenery this area has to offer.  The Park is located 10 minutes from Boreas Inn.  We are soooo lucky to have Cape D State Park in our backyard.  So come to Boreas Inn and we will direct you to our favorite park, Cape Disappointment!  Enjoy the YouTube about Cape D.!

 

 

 

Build the Sandcastle of Your Dreams in Long Beach, WA

July 1st, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

SandSations, in Long Beach, Washington, was voted #1 Best Sand Castle contest in the USA by Coastal Living Magazine! The  sand sculpture weekend is coming right up on July 20th-24th.  Boreas still has rooms available if you would like to build castles and sculptures or if you simply enjoy marveling at the artistry of the masters, watching teams working together to achieve a goal and learn how the process works.  I used to participate in the Cannon Beach competition for around 12 years and my team used to place #1 in our sand sculpting masters category. We sculpted completely by hand.  We were consistently top prize winners–that is, until this group of architects from Seattle were added to our category and used sophisticated forms and packing devices…and we didn’t always place first after that.  (Coincidentally, we had one of those Seattle architect/sand sculptors as a guest at the Inn!) But talking about immediate gratification–you take a plot of sand, dig up a pile, decide who on your team does what well (I’m good at packing, making hands and letters) then together, the team works magic and achieves a goal within hours.  Nothing artificial…just sand and water.  It is wonderful! We used to finish off our plots with perfectly smooth borders and beautifully worked lettering.  I haven’t seen anything to match our fine finish work anywhere.  We usually constructed the sculpture with a theme that was based upon  a pun.  We were so good and getting a blue ribbon was the icing on the cake.  Our Captain’s mother, Betty Lou Tolan was the founder of the contest in Cannon Beach in the early 60′s.  The party to celebrate our achievement afterward was always the best time of the year.  Ah… those were the days.

This contest in Long Beach awards cash to the winners.  We got only ribbons at Cannon Beach and maybe a printed certificate.  It didn’t matter.  The intensity of taking on a project with sand and sea water and coming up with a fine sculpture was reward enough. SandSations is a great event here in Long Beach, Washington and it’s growing every year.  You can experience the great hospitality at Boreas Inn, dine on our feast at breakfast time, walk our trail to the beach and watch the SandSations competition!  So come to the beach for a long weekend, July 21-24!

We’re Always Cooking Up a Storm at Boreas B&B in Long Beach, Washington

May 21st, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

Odell Hathaway, our guest/friend/budding videographer likes to take pics and video of me doing the “Food Tour” at breakfast time.  You might be able to focus on the food in the video while I am focusing on my ever-drooping face!  Both are entertaining.  In this video, I have prepared breakfast for a small group of returning guests a couple of weekends ago. Bill was in Eugene for the weekend and I had our guests/friends all to myself!  The baked apple french toast I am describing is an adapted recipe originally from The Shelburne Inn, our dear friends, David and Laurie.  I love making this dish–something you can put together the night before and bake in the morning.  Thanks to Odell for posting this video to YouTube!  Come to Boreas Inn–we have availability over Memorial Day weekend—which is NEXT weekend.  We promise to make you very happy indeed at our Long Beach Washington Bed and Breakfast.  Boreas inn is upscale, but never pretentious!

Susie’s Special Super Sunsets in the Springtime

March 27th, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

Bill and I take a lot of pictures of sunrises and sunsets wherever we happen to be.  Bill is the sunrise and I’m the sunset specialist.  He’s the more alert morning guy and I’m the evening person.  We each think that the pics the other takes look a lot like the myriad of  sunset and sunrise pics we’ve each taken, but to us they all look different and fascinating. So–this time of year at the beach is perfect for taking pictures–the light is beautiful, the rainbows sometimes are doubles and on the rare occasion, we have seen triples.  We pull off the roads and whip out our cell phones if that’s all we have, and take pictures.  We can’t help ourselves.  From Boreas Inn decks and windows, if you have your camera ready, you can catch the eagles flying by and the marsh hawks cruising the dunes looking for prey.   Wait for sundown, my favorite time and capture the beauty of the sun leaving for the day. At this time of year, the rebirth of my precious flowers in the (currently wild-looking) gardens , the wild weather and the promise of warmer days lift my spirits.  Do you feel the same?

The Sky is on Fire!

Born in the Year of the Dragon, sometimes I see them in the clouds…

Clamming This Weekend on the Long Beach Peninsula!

March 15th, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

Come to Long Beach this weekend and get the best of both worlds–luxurious B&B, great food and razor clamming–which is getting right down to the real nitty gritty (to coin a phrase from the 70′s)!  Crawl out of your beautiful, warm, cushy Boreas bed in the morning an hour or so before low tide on Sunday, then freeze your fannies off in the early morning digs and be back at the Inn with your limit of 15 razor clams, warming up by the fire with our great coffee by 9:30 am breakfast time!  The first dig on Saturday is actually a late afternoon dig–so you can work up an appetite for dinner at one of our fine dinner houses! We will make all arrangements!

Long Beach, Washington will open for razor clam digging for FOUR days at noon March 19!  Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, advises prospective diggers to pay particular attention to the shift in digging times during this month’s razor-clam opening.   “It gets a little tricky scheduling digs at this time of year, but the goal is to arrange openings during the best clam tides,” Ayres said. “The split schedule also provides an opportunity for back-to-back digs the evening of Saturday, March 19, and the morning of Sunday, March 20.”

Digging days and low tides for March are:

  • Saturday, March 19, 7:04 p.m. (-0.1 ft); Long Beach
  • Sunday, March 20, 7:36 a.m. (-0.5 ft); Long Beach
  • Monday, March 21, 8:23 a.m. (-0.9 ft); Long Beach

·         Tuesday March 22, 9:12 a.m. (-1.0 ft); Long Beach   So get your clam digging license, required if you are age 15 or older and come down and dig some razor clams.   Ayres reminds diggers that WDFW is tentatively planning another razor-clam opening April 7-9 until noon each day at Long Beach and Twin Harbors if marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat. Licenses expire on March 31,  so you need to make sure, for the April digs coming up, that you get a new license.

It was a beautiful, calm day of razor clamming at Beard's Hollow

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