Posts Tagged ‘Boreas Bed and Breakfast Inn’

Gray Whales Cruising by Long Beach, WA

January 23rd, 2014 by Susie Goldsmith

Seeing and hearing whales always causes an inexplicable joy in me. Humans are fascinated with their fellow mammals. Whales breath air, have hair, are warmblooded and give birth to live offspring that suckle milk from their mothers.  Gray whales range in length from 40-50 feet and can have flukes (tales) that can measure ten feet across. Females are usually larger than males .  The Gray whales weigh 50,000 to 80,000 pounds and can live up to 50 years. They can start growing barnacles even as youngsters.  We’ve seen Grays rubbing their barnacles on the North Jetty at Cape Disappointment State Park in Ilwaco, Washington, 10 minutes from our B&B, Boreas Inn.

On occasion you can see a Gray whale fluke off the Long Beach Peninsula!

On occasion you can see a Gray whale fluke off the Long Beach Peninsula!

Two times each year, the Gray whales cruise by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula.  After spending summers feeding and fattening up in the Arctic waters, the Gray whales head south cruising off the Pacific Coast to the bays in Southern California and Baja, Mexico.  You can witness this migration starting in mid-December and it peaks in early January and can usually be seen into early February.

When Gray whales are cruising by the Long Beach Peninsula, whether heading north or south, the whale’s goal is to get where they are going and generally they do not hang around and feed–except for maybe some shrimp-like creatures and a fish or two.  In fact, they are known to go without food for 3 to 5 months, which is why they must fatten up when in the rich Arctic waters before heading south to play in Baja.  While in Baja, the whales mate and nurse their young. The gestation period for Grays is 11-13 months.  When nursing, Gray whale moms can produce up to 50 gallons of milk daily containing over 50% fat. Calves can gain 60-70 pounds a day and build up their blubber quite quickly.

The Grays begin their return journey back north to the Arctic from Baja starting in mid-March. The immature whales, adult males and females without offspring head north first cruising by our coast in March and April. Then later, females with calves head north at a slower rate, passing the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula in May.  So there is the possibility of seeing whales on and off for about six months of the year. We have seen gray whales in the surf-line from the lookout on Loop 100 in September leading us to believe that some Gray whales must be hanging out on the Washington coast much of the year.  So maybe there are now “home” pods of Gray whales.

The best spots here to watch for whales is from the North Head Lighthouse and the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center at Cape Disappointment State Park, a 10 minute drive from Boreas Inn.  The whales can spout up to 15 feet in the air through their two blowholes, so that is often what we see when we watch for whales at the Park.  When we have gray skies, the whales water and skies are fairly close in color so the spouting is sometimes all you can see.  Bring your binoculars or borrow ours–there’s no guarantee you will see Gray whales, but it is fun to look.  With the fabulous weather we’ve been having all fall and winter, this is a great activity on the Long Beach Peninsula! It’s much easier to see gray whales when there is blue sky!

This is more likely what you will see--the spout! Thrilling!

This is more likely what you will see–the spout! Thrilling!

The #1 New Years’ Resolution

January 8th, 2014 by Susie Goldsmith

So what is the Innkeeper’s #1 New Years’ Resolution? Here we are on day 8 of 2014 and I’ve already blown my #1 2014 New Years Resolution–which was to work out three times a week at SNAP Fitness, our great new local 24 hour gym. It is not that Boreas Inn is slamming busy this time of year.  Being overwhelmed by lots of guests, unfortunately, is not a good reason not to work out three times per week like it is in the busy season. So what is it that devastates my #1 New Years’ Resolution? Each day seems to evaporate.  Poof!  And the gym isn’t a part of it.

New Years' Resolution

I do not think I will lift large weights. Maybe just some elliptical and circuit work?

Twenty four hours per week really do evaporate at DaVita, my other job that has re-immersed me in clinical social work, my first passion. Intense, necessary, important to me and hopefully my patients and it is very worthwhile work.  When one is accustomed to working seven days per week for 18 years, cramming in another 24 hours in the work week at DaVita is no big deal, right?

Let’s see, other impediments to  me keeping my #1 New Years’ Resolution….The Visitor’s Bureau Executive Committee and Board. Some hours in the first two weeks of the month, then email…not such a huge time commitment, right? Right. The Washington Bed&Breakfast Guild Board of Directors meetings. Quarterly meetings, email, love the organization, 2.5 days this week. Completely mentally and emotionally satisfying teamwork with a fun, interesting, inspiring group of committed entrepreneurial innkeepers.

Ahhh…that’s what happened to my #1 New Years’ Resolution for 2014.  It’s day 8–I’ve only worked out twice.  But I have worked out my brain on a daily basis.  But that does not register on a FitBit!  And not to forget, we have had a few guests at Boreas Inn too.

Now that I’ve analyzed and viewed in print what’s been up in the first 8 days of 2014,  I understand why I have not kept my #1 New Years Resolution for this year.  And I WILL meet my commitment to myself and work out at SNAP Fitness three times per week.  Or maybe two…  :-)  :-)

Putting my #1 New Years’ Resolution aside, there is good stormy weather and high surf predicted for this coming weekend and nowhere is better than Boreas Inn  and the available Yett Beach House to watch a winter storm on the Long Beach Peninsula!  Boreas Inn has beautiful beds, cozy fireplaces, and a fine breakfast befitting a King and Queen (which are also our bed sizes)! Bill and I will be here in fine form with nothing but time to devote to showing our guests the best B&B experience on the coast.  ( The extra special treat this weekend is the Seahawks game at 1:35 pm on Saturday, the 11th. Our guests will be invited to watch the game with us, dressed in our Seahawks jersey finest, at The Lost Roo.  Seven giant TV’s should be adequate for viewing!

And hopefully this weekend, maybe we can walk in the rain…to SNAP Fitness to work out! Boreas Inn Innkeepers entertaining in the Kitchen.

The Holidays are a Time to Visit Boreas Inn and Dig Razor Clams!

December 13th, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

Stay at Boreas Inn  this month! We have some availability for Christmas and plenty New Years and all you need for Christmas are gifts for  under the Boreas tree.  A ready-made holiday is yours complete with decorations! Just bring your toothbrush!

Our Crab Cake and Champagne Brunch on New Years’ Day is about as delectable as any breakfast you’ve ever had because we like to start the year out right! The Depot, Pelicano, The Shelburne Inn Restaurant, 42nd Street and Jimella and Nanci’s are open for New Years’ and if you would like to dine out on Christmas, many of these restaurants are open–we will set up your dinners!!  There will be fireworks on New Years’ Eve sponsored by the City of Long Beach!

Readers of this blog and Facebook friends can go for our Walk-in Rate ($150 for $179 rooms and $170 for the $199 Dunes Suite)  if you can book at least two nights! Just mention it in your online reservation notes and we will fix your rate  in the system!

The Inn was decorated by our guests and family last weekend and we had such a relaxing time time doing it–that in reality, it didn’t get completed. So Bill has hung the fresh cedar boughs and new lights outside this week!

This weekend is the annual B&B Open House with The Shelburne, Charles Nelson Guest House and Boreas Inn participating  Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 pm.  Come by and see us and taste some great cookies baked by Bill and Susie!  Open House Visitors are encouraged to bring along non-perishable food items and canned foods to donate to our local food banks.  It’s a hungry time of year for many of our neighbors, so we hope we can make a tiny difference!

The Port of Ilwaco is again hosting the World’s Largest Crab Pot Christmas Tree.  How many of you have seen one of those?  Many of the Saturday Market artisans have moved indoors on the Port to sell their wares for the holidays and are open on the weekends until Christmas.  Shopping on the Peninsula is very good–I used to come here from Portland, before I moved here, just to shop before the holidays!

For even more activities this weekend and over New Years, there are razor clams to be harvested this weekend, December 14th,15th,16th and then over New Years on December 29th, 30th and 31st! These are late afternoon tides…easy and fun. The clamming has been great this year.

Once a year we do a Holiday Newsletter, “The Boreas Barometer”. We will do them more frequently in the future, but do not want to be nuisance emailers!  I have no way of attaching the entire newsletter to this blog post, but do have a picture of the masthead!  It is a pretty newsletter..produced with my own pics by Reservation Nexus, our reservation system webmasters.   Boreas Inn is fortunate to have a few thousand people on our email list and we hope that the newsletter is informative and lets readers know we’re thinking of them!  If you’d like one, just drop us a line to boreas@boreasinn.com and we will send you one!!  We wish you a very Happy Christmas and a Healthy and Prosperous New Years full of love and friendship!       Your innkeepers, Susie Goldsmith and Bill Verner

Our holiday newsletter is out today!

Our holiday newsletter is out today!

Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger at Boreas Inn

September 4th, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

We were delighted to host The Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger aka Alison Conliffe and her husband Nigel at Boreas last weekend.  They hail from Bonney Lake although Nigel, is originally from the U.K.  as most Nigels are! :-)  The Bonney Lassie got to meet my friend and her fellow Garden Blogger Skyler Walker aka Tangly Cottage and met Skyler’s husband Allen and toured Skyler’s glorious gardens at her home in Ilwaco.  Skyler blogs about our gardens frequently, taking images of particular areas from “before” to “after” so you can actually see the work in progress.  Bonney Lassie took all “after” pictures which was refreshing to see someone else’s  interpretation of the “finished product”.  And yes, it is September and the gardens have passed their “sell by” date, but are still looking quite beautiful compared to most other years, when they are fading earlier in the season.

I think this year the gardens are more vital because they are stuffed with gorgeous perennials, thanks to Skyler and also to my own attempted concentration on limiting the annuals, the “color spots”, for which I have a great weakness, to only pots on the decks and my flower boxes.  But also, because I have never enjoyed my own gardens more, I am taking better care of them than usual and have watered and fertilized more often and will continue to do so until I can no longer prolong the inevitable.  I replanted the kitchen window box yesterday, removed the overgrown, leggy violas and planted mums and colorful “winter” pansies.

Bonney Lassie snapped the cosmos! Alison Conliffe is a fine photographer!

Bonney Lassie snapped the cosmos! Alison Conliffe is a fine photographer!

Begonias on the front deck of Boreas Inn, pic by Alison Conliffe

Begonias on the front deck of Boreas Inn, pic by Alison Conliffe

Fuschias in the front courtyard and on the Boreas deck are pretty garnishes for the pastry plates at Boreas. Pic taken by Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger, Alison Conliffe!

Fuchsias in the front courtyard and on the Boreas deck are pretty garnishes for the pastry plates at Boreas. Pic taken by Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger, Alison Conliffe!

Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger, Alison Conliffe snapped her husband on the Boreas deck

Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger, Alison Conliffe snapped her husband on the Boreas deck

Alison Conliffe, Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger captured brilliant dahlia on the Boreas Deck

Alison Conliffe, Bonney Lassie Garden Blogger captured brilliant dahlia on the Boreas Deck

 

 

Himalayan honeysuckle or Leycenteria formosa is a noxious weed to some, but not to me!  It sits dripping with berries and flowers in the front courtyard of Boreas. Photo by Alison Conliffe.

Himalayan honeysuckle or Leycenteria formosa is a noxious weed to some, but not to me! It sits dripping with berries and flowers in the front courtyard of Boreas. Photo by Alison Conliffe.

Bonney Lassie liked the Buddha in the Cosmos and got this pic.

Bonney Lassie liked the Buddha in the Cosmos and got this pic.

Another dahlia floating in glass in the garden captured by Bonney Lassie!

Another dahlia floating in glass in the garden captured by Bonney Lassie!

 

Susie likes to float dahlias and Alison Conliffe, the Bonney Lassie Blogger caught this image!

Susie likes to float dahlias and Alison Conliffe, the Bonney Lassie Blogger caught this image!

10th Annual Wild Mushroom Celebration at Boreas Inn, October 11-13, 2013

August 2nd, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

Boreas Inn’s Wild Mushroom Celebration weekend is October 11th-13th, 2013.

  • The special weekend at Boreas Inn includes a four-course Wild Mushroom and Wine dinner on Saturday night, October 12th, at Pelicano Restaurant. Boreas Inn’s traditional Wild Mushroom Celebration Brunch on Sunday is 6-courses and a chance to have breakfast with Veronica Williams, our “All Wild” expert mushroom forager.
  • The cost for the weekend is $560 per couple in the $179 rooms for two nights, two brunches, the Pelicano Mushroom and Wine Dinner, with the extra special Boreas Inn Wild Mushroom Celebration Brunch on Sunday with complementary sparkling wine at no extra charge. This price includes all taxes and restaurant gratuities. The Dunes is an extra $45–$605 all-inclusive.
  • Add a night to any room for just $160 plus tax and that includes The Dunes–a $29-$39 savings!
  • Veronica will host a casual Wild Mushroom Discussion in the Boreas living room open to the public on Sunday at around 11 a.m. Please RSVP for the Wild Mushroom Discussion.
This particular 5" chanterelle has enchanted us for years. Delicious and so beautiful.

This particular 5″ chanterelle has enchanted us for years. Delicious and so beautiful.

Celebrate Wild Mushrooms with us!

The most perfect one yet!

The most perfect one yet!

Bill surrounded Susie, on her birthday, with wild mushrooms found within yards of Boreas!

Bill surrounded Susie, on her birthday, with wild mushrooms found within yards of Boreas!

Dine At the Source with our Local Mushrooms as key ingredients! King Boletus, Chanterelles and Matsutaki's all in one place!

Dine At the Source with our Local Mushrooms as key ingredients! King Boletus, Chanterelles and Matsutaki’s all in one place!

“Lost Weekend” at Boreas Inn & the Implications of Legalized Marijuana at B&B’s!

March 3rd, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

The State of Washington has legalized marijuana and is working on administrative guidelines for distribution and sales.  The legalization of marijuana has marketing implications for the Bed and Breakfast industry, of that we’re sure.  B&B’s certainly are known for “Winemaker’s Weekends” and wine-tasting afternoons…but wait a minute! The rules have changed!

Nobody we know of has had the nerve yet to market a “lost weekend” theme for pot smokers and “green butter” eaters.  Our fantasies have left us giggling and wondering about what could, in reality, be a huge marketing advantage in the B&B business.  Cooking with “green butter” could leave willing participants wondering what happened to their weekend. Having pot sampling reminiscent of the cafes in Amsterdam has many of us wondering how that might be done.  Smoking is not allowed inside commercial buildings, but 25 feet from the inn, it is legal. But foods made with “green butter” certainly do not pollute the air!

In our “Lost Weekend at Boreas” fantasy, we can imagine guests ruminating, “We doblogcoupleonthebeach remember checking into Boreas Inn, having a blissful nights’ sleep in their amazing beds, eating their legendary breakfasts, dining out at The Depot, Pelicano, the 42nd Street Cafe, all on Saturday night, but more than that, we can’t remember a thing!”  Well–that’s  probably not going to happen, but then again, it could.  Would that be different than guests being intoxicated with alcohol?  Yes, it would be very different.  We do not have experience with super intoxicated guests so we don’t imagine that our pot-smoking, “green butter eating” guests would have inappropriate behavior.  Stoned guests would be peaceful and definitely more food-oriented and we certainly can cater to that! Would we have to transport guests to and from their culinary adventures if they are high? Yes, we would!  Is there potential for B&B’s to attract more guests? Yes, there is.  So the question is raised since we have a complimentary beer and wine license, meaning we can buy wine and beer and serve it to our guests at no extra charge, would that translate to marijuana too?  I suppose we will soon have answers! Until then, we can continue to dream up our “Lost Weekend at Boreas” themes.  And giggle.

The “Real” Santa Visits Boreas Inn -Long Beach, WA

December 20th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

It has never happened before.  A guest merely emerges from their bedroom for breakfast and the innkeepers are speechless and their eyes fill with tears.  These tears were of surprise and joy.  With almost a child-like wonder–our eyes must have been huge–two adults became children once again. On December 25, 2011, our only guests at Boreas Inn for Christmas morning were Lindley and Charlotte Mixon from Raymond, WA.  When they came in the front door, it did occur to us that he was a lovely older gentleman with a white beard and how ironic that it was Christmas Eve.  Being polite, we said not a word about the resemblance.  We were sure he’d heard it before. 

But only when he emerged from his room on Christmas morning for breakfast, did we truly hold our breath and respond with actual childhood glee that we were in the presence of Santa and Mrs. Claus.  Lindley was dressed in a red shirt, with suspenders holding up his trousers, and had a red hat on his head trimmed with white fur.  My first words to him were, “My goodness, Santa, you must be exhausted and very hungry! Did you have a busy night?”  Yes, this Jewish girl did say that…couldn’t help it.  Lindley responded that yes, it was a tiring night but he had a good rest and was very hungry indeed.   We posed in front of the Boreas Inn tree with Mrs. Claus, Charlotte, and I couldn’t resist a shot giving Santa a kiss.  Lindley has never played Santa professionally! Bill and I were truly moved by Lindley and Charlotte.  Lindley is an artist, a warm, loving man with phenomenal talent for throwing big pots and painting.  He is currently recovering nicely from open heart surgery.  So, sadly, Santa and Mrs. Claus won’t be with us this Christmas. We will miss them and keep in touch on Facebook. We will forever remember the wonderful holiday gift they gave to us a year ago.  The richness of life in our 16 years as innkeepers never fails to reward, surprise and enrich us.  Thank you, Lindley and Charlotte, for your friendship.  Take it easy this Christmas, Lindley! Get healthy and come back soon.

On Christmas morning, 2011, Lindley Mixon and his wife Charlotte, emerged from The Dunes Suite at Boreas Inn and really, truly Susie and Bill were with Santa and Mrs. Claus!

Wild Mushrooms Will Be Celebrated October 19-21, 2012 at Boreas Inn!

October 4th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

We are concerned about the lack of rain in the Pacific Northwest because with the rains come the beautiful, plentiful wild mushrooms.  Only a couple of tenths of rain have fallen, mostly as mist, since mid-July.  The chanterelle season, in and around the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula, was surprisingly good in spite of the dry weather.  But come rain or shine, we will be celebrating the Wild Mushroom  from October 19-21 for the 11th year of Boreas Inn’s Annual Wild Mushroom Celebration!  Veronica Williams, our “All Wild” professional forager will be available to take our guests foraging on Saturday the 20th.  She will also host a discussion in the Boreas living room that is open to the public on Sunday the 21st. She always brings dehydrated wild mushrooms to sell along with her Wild Mushroom cookbook. Please call if you’re planning on attending the very informal discussion at 11 a.m. on Sunday, the 20th!

Though we were booked up for this event for over six months, we had a cancellation, and the beautiful Pacifica guest room is open for this extra-special weekend.  $590 for two people includes 2 nights at Boreas, 2 lavish breakfasts including our five-course Wild Mushroom Celebration Brunch with Veronica on Sunday,  a five-course Wild Mushroom and matching Washington Wine dinner for two (with the celebration group!) at Pelicano Restaurant on the Port, all taxes and restaurant gratuity are also included.  Add an extra night at our $150 “Walk-in Rate”!  (Most of the guests have added a Thursday night to their weekend!) Mushroom foraging with Veronica on Saturday, the 20th, is $45 pp.  Call today to get our last room for this relaxing celebration of the wild mushroom extravaganza! This special is not listed on our reservation site, so if you book online, ask for the Wild Mushroom Celebration in your note to us and we will adjust your reservation for you!

Wild Mushrooms abound around the Long Beach Washington Peninsula!

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day with Guests and Friends of Boreas Inn, Long Beach, Washington

June 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

It is the unexpected brilliant sunny days when the forecast is semi-dreary that make living on the Long Beach Washington Peninsula so interesting and wonderful.  We chose today to have a Puppy and Pizza Celebration at Cape Disappointment State Park at Waikiki Beach’s Serious Pizza with our friend and long-time guest Odell Hathaway, who has a new therapy/assistance dog, Phoenix.  Boreas Inn welcomes assistance dogs and we are getting to know Phoenix, the puppy, who will within two years, be a fully trained assistance dog. Odell has a couple of health issues that have the potential to require Phoenix’s help.  In the meanwhile, this puppy, who Odell found through Oregon Assistance Dogs, is a gem of a baby golden retriever. At 15 pounds, she is a bundle of love and she is oh so soft and sweet.  Odell is very lucky to have found her and for a dog, you could do far worse than have Odell as a parent! Phoenix will have all the best of everything, including fine parenting!  We invited Skyler and Allen from Tangly Cottage Gardening and Jessica and Chris Miller to the celebration. They are our dear friends who know Odell from his many trips to Boreas.  We ate world-class pizza at Serious Pizza–many pizza’s as a matter of fact!  Jim and Chi make the best cherry and apple wood-fired pizza on the planet and we sampled four different pizza’s at the park.  So it was a perfect day at the best park in Washington State, eating the best pizza at Serious Pizza with some of the best folks we know!

A Pooped Puppy at our Serious Pizza Party on June 2

Spring Whale Watching on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula

February 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling, they say it’s the longest migration of  any mammal up to .

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling.

This extensive gray whale migration all the way to Baja for such a brief stay reminds me of our several family trips during spring vacation when we would drive from Lake Oswego, near Portland all the way to Ensenada, in Baja California.  It’s a long drive in a station wagon with parents and two domineering older brothers for a very brief stay in Baja.  Of course, stopping at Disneyland and in San Diego were nice distractions away from the back seat of a Plymouth station wagon.  We’d spend a few days in Baja and then turn around and drive back to Portland.  Our family migration from Portland to Baja does have a vague but humorous similarity to the gray whales’.  The gray whales tend to breed and nurse their youngsters while in the warmer waters which certainly was not our goal while in Baja.

Our favorite place to watch for the gray whales is in Cape Disappointment State Park at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center and the North Head Lighthouse.  From December until early February, we have seen the grays migrating south and then again in March, April and May when they return to the arctic.  That being said, we have seen gray whales in September just off the surf line from the stunning turnout on the Loop 100 in Cape D State Park.  There are some “permanent” gray whales living off the Washington Coast.  Just over a month ago a half dozen gigantic blue whales were spotted not far off the Long Beach Peninsula, perhaps 30 miles.  They were over 100 feet long!  Fishermen report in one day of summer fishing, seeing three or four varieties of whales including sperm whales and humpbacks or “humpies” off our coast.

Grays feed mostly on crustaceans which it eats by turning on its side (usually the right, resulting in loss of eyesight in the right eye for many older animals) and it scoops up sediments from the sea floor.  They eat by using their baleens which act like a sieve, to capture small sea animals, taken in along with sand, water and other materials they scoop up.  They feed in arctic waters during the summer and sometimes feed during its migration but mostly, when heading south, they rely on their fat reserves.  We have seen them seemingly rubbing themselves on the North Jetty near our favorite spot in the Cape D State Park.   They were feeding by scraping the rocks on the jetty.  So cool!

During migration, these giant cruisers average around 75 miles per day at an average speed of 5 mph.  The round trip of 9,900–14,000 miles is supposedly the longest annual migration of any mammal.  By late December to early January, they begin to arrive in the calving lagoons of Baja. Gestation for grays is 13.5 months so often mothers give birth in the safer waters of Baja and single females are seeking mates.  By mid-February to mid-March the whales have arrived in the lagoons and are nursing, calving and mating.

Throughout February and March, the first to leave the lagoons are males and females without new calves. Pregnant females and nursing mothers with their newborns are the last to depart, leaving only when their calves are ready for the journey, which is usually from late March to mid-April. Sometimes the mothers with new calves linger in warm waters into May.

A population of about 200 gray whales stay along the eastern Pacific coast from Canada to California throughout the summer which is why we occasionally see them in non-migration months.  They never leave to go to Alaskan waters. This summer resident group is known as the Pacific Coast Feeding Group.

Now that you know all about gray whales, drive to the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula to try to get a glimpse.  Right now you might see a few stragglers heading south and in a month or so you will see the gray whales returning from their brief stay in the warmer waters off the Baja Peninsula.  At Boreas Inn, we always have binoculars for you to borrow and helpful hints (Bill is great at spotting whales). During the busier times of migration, there are experts at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Cape D. State Park, just 10 minutes from Boreas Inn.

This is a perfect time of year to take your Valentine to the beach to watch for whales and sleep in the Boreas Inn’s lovely beds, dine by the fire on the best three-course B&B breakfast you’ve ever had, breathe the cool ocean breezes, be lulled by the gentle sound of the Pacific Ocean lapping on the beach and to relax.  Let your innkeepers, Susie Goldsmith and Bill Verner design your time away with great dinners at The Depot, Pelicano, the 42nd Street Cafe, The Lost Roo and Shelburne’s dining room and maybe an in-room massage!  Check our online specials or give us a call at 888-642-8069. We hope to see you soon!

 

 

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