The “Real” Santa Visits Boreas Inn -Long Beach, WA

December 20th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

It has never happened before.  A guest merely emerges from their bedroom for breakfast and the innkeepers are speechless and their eyes fill with tears.  These tears were of surprise and joy.  With almost a child-like wonder–our eyes must have been huge–two adults became children once again. On December 25, 2011, our only guests at Boreas Inn for Christmas morning were Lindley and Charlotte Mixon from Raymond, WA.  When they came in the front door, it did occur to us that he was a lovely older gentleman with a white beard and how ironic that it was Christmas Eve.  Being polite, we said not a word about the resemblance.  We were sure he’d heard it before. 

But only when he emerged from his room on Christmas morning for breakfast, did we truly hold our breath and respond with actual childhood glee that we were in the presence of Santa and Mrs. Claus.  Lindley was dressed in a red shirt, with suspenders holding up his trousers, and had a red hat on his head trimmed with white fur.  My first words to him were, “My goodness, Santa, you must be exhausted and very hungry! Did you have a busy night?”  Yes, this Jewish girl did say that…couldn’t help it.  Lindley responded that yes, it was a tiring night but he had a good rest and was very hungry indeed.   We posed in front of the Boreas Inn tree with Mrs. Claus, Charlotte, and I couldn’t resist a shot giving Santa a kiss.  Lindley has never played Santa professionally! Bill and I were truly moved by Lindley and Charlotte.  Lindley is an artist, a warm, loving man with phenomenal talent for throwing big pots and painting.  He is currently recovering nicely from open heart surgery.  So, sadly, Santa and Mrs. Claus won’t be with us this Christmas. We will miss them and keep in touch on Facebook. We will forever remember the wonderful holiday gift they gave to us a year ago.  The richness of life in our 16 years as innkeepers never fails to reward, surprise and enrich us.  Thank you, Lindley and Charlotte, for your friendship.  Take it easy this Christmas, Lindley! Get healthy and come back soon.

On Christmas morning, 2011, Lindley Mixon and his wife Charlotte, emerged from The Dunes Suite at Boreas Inn and really, truly Susie and Bill were with Santa and Mrs. Claus!

Where Have All the Mushrooms Gone?

October 20th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Is it because of our (wonderful) warm dry spell on the  Long Beach Peninsula that lasted almost 100 days without much moisture?  Or is it because we are having our Wild Mushroom Celebration this weekend at Boreas that the higher power has halted the handsome King Boletus (porcini) mushroom from peaking up from the soil? Even last year, a very dry summer into fall, we had porcini’s and matsu’s.  Veronica Williams, our friendly forager and queen of the woods,  has been unable to find any mushrooms in her favorite productive spots.  We are sad. Maybe today will be the day, after a week of some moisture, that the beauties will show their domes and emerge from hiding. We can only hope! So it’s out with the dehydrated porcini’s and perhaps at Pelicano Restaurant tonight, we will dine on five courses of mushrooms–they just might not be WILD ONES!

We normally worship the King Boletus this weekend. Alas, the King is in hiding!

Wild Mushrooms Will Be Celebrated October 19-21, 2012 at Boreas Inn!

October 4th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

We are concerned about the lack of rain in the Pacific Northwest because with the rains come the beautiful, plentiful wild mushrooms.  Only a couple of tenths of rain have fallen, mostly as mist, since mid-July.  The chanterelle season, in and around the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula, was surprisingly good in spite of the dry weather.  But come rain or shine, we will be celebrating the Wild Mushroom  from October 19-21 for the 11th year of Boreas Inn’s Annual Wild Mushroom Celebration!  Veronica Williams, our “All Wild” professional forager will be available to take our guests foraging on Saturday the 20th.  She will also host a discussion in the Boreas living room that is open to the public on Sunday the 21st. She always brings dehydrated wild mushrooms to sell along with her Wild Mushroom cookbook. Please call if you’re planning on attending the very informal discussion at 11 a.m. on Sunday, the 20th!

Though we were booked up for this event for over six months, we had a cancellation, and the beautiful Pacifica guest room is open for this extra-special weekend.  $590 for two people includes 2 nights at Boreas, 2 lavish breakfasts including our five-course Wild Mushroom Celebration Brunch with Veronica on Sunday,  a five-course Wild Mushroom and matching Washington Wine dinner for two (with the celebration group!) at Pelicano Restaurant on the Port, all taxes and restaurant gratuity are also included.  Add an extra night at our $150 “Walk-in Rate”!  (Most of the guests have added a Thursday night to their weekend!) Mushroom foraging with Veronica on Saturday, the 20th, is $45 pp.  Call today to get our last room for this relaxing celebration of the wild mushroom extravaganza! This special is not listed on our reservation site, so if you book online, ask for the Wild Mushroom Celebration in your note to us and we will adjust your reservation for you!

Wild Mushrooms abound around the Long Beach Washington Peninsula!

Sunny Skies for the 4th of July in Long Beach, Washington

June 30th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Pat Brown, weather anchor at ABC affiliate KGTV in San Diego stayed at Boreas a few weeks ago and we did not make her predict our weather!

We’re about to embark on July.   We can’t often brag about the Long Beach Peninsula being “hot fun in the summertime” as the song goes… but warm fun in the summertime is more like it!  The weather has been a big tease this spring and summer.  Beautiful warm days with clear skies and stunning sunsets…and then we wake up to murky skies.  Last night on Portland’s KATU weather, the prediction was for a rainy few days over the 4th of July. Today on KATU weather, the prediction is for clearing on Sunday and then an unbelievably long stretch of sunny skies.  How can the predictions change so quickly from those gloomy cloud weather icons with “rain” streaking south out of them like little silver needles to endless golden orbs crossed by a cute little stripe of “cloud” for 10 days straight?  How does a weather prediction change that radically that quickly??

Those who know me at all, understand that I am a fantasy meteorologist.  My avocation is weather and I am forever searching for forecasts and have become pretty good at predicting weather where I live.  I tend to be overly optimistic at times, however, which in the Pacific Northwest, is an OK virtue.  I constantly tell guests that the skies are going to clear, and based upon the barometric pressure, I am often correct. But I’m also often wrong. Northwest weather is tough to predict.  My biggest beef is that Portland and Seattle weather forecasters are so often incorrect in weather predictions for the coast, if that is, they even recall that the Long Beach Peninsula exists. These professionals don’t understand that when they are so wrong about the weather and predict rain, that visitors do not come to the beach and resort areas dependent upon visitors suffer from the inaccurate predictions. They should just call us on the phone and ASK us how our weather is before they blow it!

Speaking of “weather people”, we were tickled to have San Diego’s KGTV weather anchor Pat Brown and one of her best friends stay with us at Boreas Inn a few weeks ago.  They were so much fun!  I told her my fantasy about being a weather woman and she just smiled at me and said “really?”  Yes, really!!  Except here, being a weather forecaster requires being part omniscient and part snake oil salesman, able to easily slide from a rather dire prediction (if you like sun) to the complete opposite forecast quickly, articulately, without seeming to lose credibility, like last night’s’ forecast compared to this morning’s.  Very slippery, right?  Another down side of being a weather anchor she was saying is that you become known to everyone in their local area which makes it hard to go out of your house to do anything with out being recognized.   So being here was nice for her–she had some privacy to just be herself.  Until she went to Serious Pizza at Cape D State Park, where there was a family from San Diego…who recognized her!

Weather forecasters in the Pacific NW spend a lot of time being on the “Storm Team” when one snow flake is seen or one gust of wind exceeds 25.  “Storm Team Coverage” lasts for days sometimes and requires everyone to have their “Storm Team” parka’s and their “Storm Team” baseball caps and forces them to stand on cold bridges and overpasses getting spattered by passing cars as they “cover the storm.”  Yes, I now know that being on the “Storm Team” is not what it’s cracked up to be and can be totally exhausting both for the viewer and the brave forecaster on that cold windy “Sylvan Hill Overpass.”

Enough of my weather rant.  We are currently looking for a predicted long-ish stretch  of beautiful weather on the Long Beach Peninsula. The 4th of July and the next 10 days looks to be great, and Boreas Inn has rooms for you and magical breakfast cuisine. The Depot, Pelicano, Nanci and Jimella’s Market Cafe, the 42nd Street Cafe and the Lost Roo will provide luscious seafood, steaks and other local farm to table treats for your palate when you become hungry once again.  And don’t forget Serious Pizza! We just tried their tequila ice cream tonight after our wood-fired steamer clams and pizza.  Yum!

4th of July is Wild and Crazy in Long Beach, Washington

June 26th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

If you like 4th of July fireworks running continuously on 28 miles of beach, Long Beach is your spot!  Boreas Inn, Trip Advisor’s #1 B&B in the area still has some room for you to stay that even have a view of the fireworks! While the City of Long Beach fireworks display is terrific, it is often hard to tell which set of fireworks is the “official” display and which ones are the hundreds of private displays that run along the “World’s Longest Beach” in the very furthest Southwest corner of Washington State, where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. If you miss the Long Beach displays on the 4th, the Port of Ilwaco has a simply beautiful display over the Port on Saturday on July 7th!

Pyrotechnics is a rampant art form here in Long Beach, Washington, and for those who cannot get enough of the gigantic sparklers that abound on the 4th of July around the USA, the Long Beach Peninsula will give you the thrill you seek!  We promise!  We only ask that if you pack it in, you pack it out.  The Grass Roots Garbage Gang will be handing out garbage bags to all who come to the beach to play on the 4th of July and will then be conducting their post-4th clean-up starting at 9 a.m. on July 5th.  If you’d like to help, just show up on the beach approaches on the Peninsula on the 5th of July!  And who knows, maybe you will score some amazing Japanese tsunami find, like a rusted Harley complete with its crate, or maybe even the kitchen sink.  It’s sad but true.

Come to Long Beach, WA for the Best Fireworks in the Country!

The City of Long Beach has dumpsters for the tsunami junk, particularly the styrofoam that is floating in. So please come help with that!

Chinook Council Will Make Ancestral Canoe Journey June 12-15, 2012

June 8th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Our dear friend, and treasured Boreas Inn guest, Kate Elliott, sits on the Chinook Indian Nation Council.  She sent me a press release about this amazing ancestral canoe journey that will take place next week, from June 12-15,  the Chinook Indian Nation Council will travel down the Lower Columbia River Water Trail in traditional canoes.  The route, starting from Cathlapotle at the Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge will include stops in Kalama, Mayger Dock/Clatskanie, Cathlamet, Elliott Point/Pillar Rock and Chinook Point/Fort Columbia.

There are still some seats available to paddle and spots on the ground crew available.  The Chinook Indian Tribal Council  is extending an invitation to every member of the Tribe and friends of the Tribe to their to join them on this historical canoe trip either in part or for the entire journey.

The decendants of Captain William Clark gave the Chinook Nation the canoe, Klmin (keth-min), pictured above,  in September of 2011.  This beautiful canoe replaced one of the Chinook Nation’s canoes that was used by the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery.  Following the gifting of Klmin,  http://www.chinooknation.org/press.html, the Chinook Council agreed to honor its maiden voyage with a journey on their traditional waterways.  The Chinook Council consists of eight members: Chairman Ray Gardner, Vice-Chairman Sam Robinson, Secretary/Treasurer Peggy Disney and Representatives Phil Hawks, Charlie Funk, Lisa Elliott, Jeremy Wekell and Kate Elliott.

Accompanied by other Chinooks and friends, the Chinook Council will spend three days and three nights traveling down the Lower Columbia River Water Trail.  This will be a celebration of the generous gift they received this past Fall and the great river that is still home to many Chinooks today.  In addition to Klmin, this journey will include the Chairman’s family canoe, Itsxut (its-woot), and the Snohomish tribal canoe, Blue Heron.   After spending Tuesday night in the Cathlapotle plankhouse, the Chinook Council and People will take Klmin out for a solitary introduction to the waterway early Wednesday morning.  They will then place all the canoes in the water and begin the journey.  The canoes will have a sendoff by the Friends of the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge.

As the canoes travel down the river, Chinook families will host dinner and provide shelter for the travelers, much in the way of their Ancestors.  This week of sharing and commemoration will culminate in paddling down to Chinook Point on Friday morning to participate in the private Annual Chinook Nation First Salmon Ceremony.  For many years, Chinook have been working with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Washington State Historical Society and other partners to promote the Lower Columbia River Water Trail.  To honor this partnership, the National Park Service and the Port of Ilwaco will be joining the last day of the journey in their own motorized boat.

This is an important and unique regional cultural event–one that is important for all of us living in this area to understand, and to participate in, if we can!  It is a deeply moving event for those of us living where the Chinook Tribe  flourished (in paradise!). Now once again our friends, the Chinooks, can share with us their gifts of centuries-old knowledge, culture, understanding and joy. They are a national treasure and we are hoping and praying that they will again, soon, achieve the federal tribal recognition that by virtue of their history and influence for centuries, they so rightly deserve.

For more information on media relations and coordination, please contact Kate Elliott, Councilwoman Chinook Indian Nation, Chair, Communications Committee, (425) 945-6744 kate.chinook@gmail.com.

For more information on the sendoff by the Friends of the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, please contact: Katie Harrison, Cathlapotle Plankhouse Coordinator.

 

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day with Guests and Friends of Boreas Inn, Long Beach, Washington

June 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

It is the unexpected brilliant sunny days when the forecast is semi-dreary that make living on the Long Beach Washington Peninsula so interesting and wonderful.  We chose today to have a Puppy and Pizza Celebration at Cape Disappointment State Park at Waikiki Beach’s Serious Pizza with our friend and long-time guest Odell Hathaway, who has a new therapy/assistance dog, Phoenix.  Boreas Inn welcomes assistance dogs and we are getting to know Phoenix, the puppy, who will within two years, be a fully trained assistance dog. Odell has a couple of health issues that have the potential to require Phoenix’s help.  In the meanwhile, this puppy, who Odell found through Oregon Assistance Dogs, is a gem of a baby golden retriever. At 15 pounds, she is a bundle of love and she is oh so soft and sweet.  Odell is very lucky to have found her and for a dog, you could do far worse than have Odell as a parent! Phoenix will have all the best of everything, including fine parenting!  We invited Skyler and Allen from Tangly Cottage Gardening and Jessica and Chris Miller to the celebration. They are our dear friends who know Odell from his many trips to Boreas.  We ate world-class pizza at Serious Pizza–many pizza’s as a matter of fact!  Jim and Chi make the best cherry and apple wood-fired pizza on the planet and we sampled four different pizza’s at the park.  So it was a perfect day at the best park in Washington State, eating the best pizza at Serious Pizza with some of the best folks we know!

A Pooped Puppy at our Serious Pizza Party on June 2

Sunny Days This Weekend–Great for Clamming!

March 22nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Clamming at Beard's Hollow

This weekend looks to be lovely with sunshine!  The Long Beach Peninsula has early morning clam tides Saturday and Sunday so you can limit and be back in time for a warm hot tub and our signature breakfast by the fireplace at 9:30.  All of our friends have reported limiting quickly during the last clam dig–so maybe you can too!  Of course,  you don’t have to dig clams –or else send the sweetheart out to dig clams while you sleep in could be a plan too! Simply languishing in Boreas Inn’s fluffy feather beds in our oceanside Long Beach, WA lodging will make your weekend divine. We will set up dinners out in our favorite haunts.  Whether you clam or not, you will dig it at Boreas!

Come Hunt This Weekend for The Pacific Razor Clam — Siliqua Patula

February 16th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

The hunt for the beautiful and delicious bivalve will resume this weekend on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula. The digs are late afternoon/ early evening with low tide Saturday, Feb.18, is at 4:13 p.m. (0.0 feet), and on Sunday, Feb.19, at 5 p.m. (-0.2 feet).  Plan on being on the beach one to two hours before evening low tide.  You will truly feel you have earned your supper when you dig and clean your clams and then have the privilege of dining on the most gourmet clam of them all, the Siliqua Patula!  Stay at beautiful Boreas Inn on the beach in Long Beach, Washington and we will loan you clam guns and Bill might even show you how to clean your clams and may, even, if you’re very lucky, show you how to cook and EAT them!  The spring clam tides will be announced soon, so there will be many more weekends with a chance to dig those glorious bivalves!

Long Beach, Washington is Clamming Paradise!

Spring Whale Watching on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula

February 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling, they say it’s the longest migration of  any mammal up to .

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling.

This extensive gray whale migration all the way to Baja for such a brief stay reminds me of our several family trips during spring vacation when we would drive from Lake Oswego, near Portland all the way to Ensenada, in Baja California.  It’s a long drive in a station wagon with parents and two domineering older brothers for a very brief stay in Baja.  Of course, stopping at Disneyland and in San Diego were nice distractions away from the back seat of a Plymouth station wagon.  We’d spend a few days in Baja and then turn around and drive back to Portland.  Our family migration from Portland to Baja does have a vague but humorous similarity to the gray whales’.  The gray whales tend to breed and nurse their youngsters while in the warmer waters which certainly was not our goal while in Baja.

Our favorite place to watch for the gray whales is in Cape Disappointment State Park at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center and the North Head Lighthouse.  From December until early February, we have seen the grays migrating south and then again in March, April and May when they return to the arctic.  That being said, we have seen gray whales in September just off the surf line from the stunning turnout on the Loop 100 in Cape D State Park.  There are some “permanent” gray whales living off the Washington Coast.  Just over a month ago a half dozen gigantic blue whales were spotted not far off the Long Beach Peninsula, perhaps 30 miles.  They were over 100 feet long!  Fishermen report in one day of summer fishing, seeing three or four varieties of whales including sperm whales and humpbacks or “humpies” off our coast.

Grays feed mostly on crustaceans which it eats by turning on its side (usually the right, resulting in loss of eyesight in the right eye for many older animals) and it scoops up sediments from the sea floor.  They eat by using their baleens which act like a sieve, to capture small sea animals, taken in along with sand, water and other materials they scoop up.  They feed in arctic waters during the summer and sometimes feed during its migration but mostly, when heading south, they rely on their fat reserves.  We have seen them seemingly rubbing themselves on the North Jetty near our favorite spot in the Cape D State Park.   They were feeding by scraping the rocks on the jetty.  So cool!

During migration, these giant cruisers average around 75 miles per day at an average speed of 5 mph.  The round trip of 9,900–14,000 miles is supposedly the longest annual migration of any mammal.  By late December to early January, they begin to arrive in the calving lagoons of Baja. Gestation for grays is 13.5 months so often mothers give birth in the safer waters of Baja and single females are seeking mates.  By mid-February to mid-March the whales have arrived in the lagoons and are nursing, calving and mating.

Throughout February and March, the first to leave the lagoons are males and females without new calves. Pregnant females and nursing mothers with their newborns are the last to depart, leaving only when their calves are ready for the journey, which is usually from late March to mid-April. Sometimes the mothers with new calves linger in warm waters into May.

A population of about 200 gray whales stay along the eastern Pacific coast from Canada to California throughout the summer which is why we occasionally see them in non-migration months.  They never leave to go to Alaskan waters. This summer resident group is known as the Pacific Coast Feeding Group.

Now that you know all about gray whales, drive to the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula to try to get a glimpse.  Right now you might see a few stragglers heading south and in a month or so you will see the gray whales returning from their brief stay in the warmer waters off the Baja Peninsula.  At Boreas Inn, we always have binoculars for you to borrow and helpful hints (Bill is great at spotting whales). During the busier times of migration, there are experts at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Cape D. State Park, just 10 minutes from Boreas Inn.

This is a perfect time of year to take your Valentine to the beach to watch for whales and sleep in the Boreas Inn’s lovely beds, dine by the fire on the best three-course B&B breakfast you’ve ever had, breathe the cool ocean breezes, be lulled by the gentle sound of the Pacific Ocean lapping on the beach and to relax.  Let your innkeepers, Susie Goldsmith and Bill Verner design your time away with great dinners at The Depot, Pelicano, the 42nd Street Cafe, The Lost Roo and Shelburne’s dining room and maybe an in-room massage!  Check our online specials or give us a call at 888-642-8069. We hope to see you soon!

 

 

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