Archive for the ‘Whale Watching’ Category

Adventures Within 15 minutes of Boreas Inn

February 25th, 2016 by Susie Goldsmith

This week, we had visitors from Bend, two of our best friends who migrated from Portland to Central Oregon about the same time we migrated to Long Beach, Washington. Innkeeping at Boreas Inn is tough work, consuming days, then weeks, then months, even in the winter time when we have fewer guests.  We fall into the habit of not taking any time off to enjoy adventures within 15 minutes of Boreas Inn. So we decided that we would all be tourists and go hiking around our area and at the same time, stay close to home.

We chose the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge for our Sunday adventure. The WNWF consists of a number of “units” both on the Long Beach Peninsula itself, including Leadbetter Point on the northern tip of land to Long Island in the Willapa Bay and across the Bay to the Refuge Headquarters on Highway 101 northbound, across from the boat ramp. We drive by the headquarters frequently on the way to South Bend or Seattle. But we seldom stop except to use the restrooms. Shame on us!  This was a day, indeed, to fall in love again with the Long Beach Peninsula, staying within 15 minutes of home.

We decided to do some hiking at the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge headquarters, home to the Willapa Art Trail and the Cutthroat Climb (a 1.5 mile round trip loop of moderate difficulty),  our chosen adventures on Sunday, the 21st of February.  The Art Walk has depictions of wildlife habitat and creatures you might find in the refuge teaching visitors about the stream and forest lands they will experience. Students from the University of Washington Public Arts Program designed, constructed, and installed the artwork for the Art Trail under the direction of their professors.

blogWNLRfriends

Kathy, Bill and Larry on the Cutthroat Trail. 2.21.16

Perhaps Kathy’s great grandpa cut down this tree! Kathy is not tall, but the stump is huge and would dwarf just about anybody.

The Cutthroat Climb is moderate in difficulty with steps that were a little muddy and slick, but not hazardous to climb. It tooks us an hour. The ecosystems on this walk are diverse with wetlands, streams, forest with amphibians (newts and frogs) and lots of birds. Kathy is a forester and is a good hiking companion because she knows habitat, trees and is also brilliant about identifying birds.  The forest was rich in tweeting; using the original definition of “tweet”. The music was beautiful. Kathy’s great grandfather as well as two of her great uncles were loggers and many years ago, this part of the Refuge was part of their logging territory. So it is entirely possible we were walking where her elders had logged timber.  There are lots of enormous stumps with “springboard notches” chopped into the trees to support boards for loggers to stand on to saw the trees. Perhaps her Great Grandpa used these very notches to carve down the enormous trees. Giant hemlock and Sitka spruce still prevail.  There is no admission charge to the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge.

Having explored the Refuge, we opted for a trip on Monday, the 22nd to our favorite place, Cape Disappointment State Park.  We always love Waikiki Beach in all types of weather and Monday was no exception.

Always a place to take pics. This is early spring at Waikiki Beach at Cape D. 2.22.16

Always a place to take pics. This is early spring at Waikiki Beach at Cape D. 2.22.16

It was warm and sunny and the waves were nice and big.  The logs that had been tossed around by the storms in late December and early January were deposited in places far from their usual landing spots all around the Waikiki Beach and park area. We had to see it to believe what we had seen in pictures. We hiked to the Cape Disappointment Lighthouse form the parking lot of the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center, which was closed. My favorite pic of the day is of Dead Man’s Cove on that hike.

My favorite picture of the two days of wandering 15 minutes from home. Dead Man's Cove on the trail to the Cape D Lighthouse.

My favorite picture of the two days of wandering 15 minutes from home. Dead Man’s Cove on the trail to the Cape D Lighthouse.

The seawater was sparkling brilliantly in the sunshine and we had a feeling that we were all alone in the woods with this view all to ourselves.  Which was the truth.  We relaxed awhile at the Lighthouse, talked a bit to the Coasties who were manning the Cape D Lighthouse, and headed back to the car.  To utilize Cape Disappointment State Park, you must have purchased a daily or annual Discover Pass.

The rest of our Monday adventure, we must admit, was 30 minutes from home. Hungry for a beer and munchies, we crossed the bridge to Astoria and hit the Fort George Brewery for a late lunch. Fort George just had their Dark Arts Celebration, Kathy had the Coffee Girl brew that was very dark, a bit sweet, very creamy and full of coffee and chocolate. It was delicious. I started to dream of cooking cakes with Coffee Girl and plan to incorporate “dark arts” into Boreas Inn’s menu. Larry had a Nut Red Ale, Bill his Vortex IPA and I had an IPA also, citrusy and floral; I forget which one.  The Jambalaya and fresh albacore tuna melt hit the spot for us. A bit tired from our expedition, we returned home.

On Tuesday, we took a quick hike to Bell’s View at the North Head Lighthouse

Bell's View is our favorite place to perform tiny weddings for guests at Boreas Inn.

Bell’s View is our favorite place to perform tiny weddings for guests at Boreas Inn.

and then up to the McKenzie Head from the camping area at Cape D State Park.  Once again in search of libation and food, longing for Serious Pizza, which is not open yet at the Park, we drove to Pickled Fish at the Adrift Hotel and ate wood-fired pizza and I had my favorite drink, the Burro, a Moscow Mule made with tequila. Ohhh delicious.  Having played tourist for a few hours each day, we felt as though we had fallen in love with the Long Beach Peninsula. All over again. And almost all of our adventures were indeed within 15 minutes of Boreas Inn. We are happy to help you plan your itinerary when you visit Boreas Inn!  We loved having Kathy and Larry Katz from Bend, Oregon, provide the reason to get away, even for a quickie adventure or three. We live in paradise; there is no question about that!

The Red Chair Goes Fishing!

August 10th, 2015 by Susie Goldsmith

Red had quite a day today hanging out with our friend, Ian Wood, deckhand on the Time Bandit from the Deadliest Catch!  Red’s sitting on the deck of Ian’s beautiful new tuna fishing boat, FV Pacific Quest at the Port of Ilwaco, Washington.  Boreas Inn’s Bill Verner thought it would be exciting for Red to meet a hero from the Deadliest Catch who might soon be on a West Coast version of National Geographic’s show “Wicked Tuna” with his new boat.  The Port of Ilwaco is the home to the fishing fleet near the Mouth of the Columbia River, where over 2,000 boats and ships have have gone down–more than in the rounding of the infamous Cape Horn! A spectacular area for sports and commercial fishing, salmon, halibut, rock fish, Dungeness Crab are a few of the tasty jewels  pulled from the sea and the Columbia River closeonly a few miles from Long Beach, Washington’s Boreas Inn. This is only one of the today’s adventures experienced by the Red Chair Travels! 

Ian Wood, Deckhand on the Deadliest Catch's Time Bandit hosted Red on his tuna boat today!

Ian Wood, Deckhand on the Deadliest Catch’s Time Bandit hosted Red on his tuna boat today!

Red is the "Skipper of the Day" of Ian Wood's new tuna boat, FV Pacific Quest.

Red is the “skipper of the day” of Ian Wood’s new tuna boat.

Red is just sitting around on Ian's boat today!

Red is just sitting around on Ian’s boat today!

Red hanging with the old tree (19)

Red looks insignificant alongside this old growth fir tree on the trail to Bell’s View at Cape Disappointment State Park.

Red hanging with the old tree

The Red Chair is hanging around its relatives today at Cape Disappointment State Park!

Red also cruised to Cape Disappointment State Park

This Lookout, called Bell's View is one of the prettiest in the State of Washington

This Lookout, called Bell’s View is one of the prettiest in the State of Washington

My favorite spot, Waikiki Beach, at Cape D State Park, Ilwaco, WA on January 13, 2015

My favorite spot, Waikiki Beach, at Cape D State Park, Ilwaco, WA.

Blue Skies at the North Head Lighthouse

Blue Skies at the North Head Lighthouse

and the North Head Lighthouse.  Our favorite trail there, Bell’s View, was on the agenda. We officiated two tiny weddings there last week and wanted Red to see the old growth forest on the pathway and the glorious view of the 28 mile-long Long Beach Peninsula. On a clear day, the Olympic Mountain Range can be seen in the distance, north of the peninsula.  The North Head Lighthouse is being restored from the wear and tear it experiences in winds topping 140 mph during some of the storms we can get along the beach. The headlands, 4 miles south of Boreas Inn host two lighthouses, the North Head and Cape Disappointment Lighthouses.  This immense park is one of five state parks on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula.  Cape D is the location of Maya Lin’s Confluence Project that honors our local Chinook Indian tribe encountered by Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery when they arrived at the Pacific Ocean. Clark and the Corps walked on the Boreas Inn property on November 19, 1805. Of course we weren’t there yet, but that’s where the ocean was in 1805!  This is the last day for Boreas Inn to host the Red Chair, which will be traveling tomorrow on to Nathan and Casey Allen at Swantown Inn Bed and Breakfast in Olympia, WA! Fare thee well, Red Chair. We love you!

Red at Bell's View observation deck at Cape D State Park

Red at Bell’s View observation deck at Cape D State Park

Bell's View and Red

High on an observation platform overlooking the Pacific Ocean at Bell’s View, Red is watching for the early gray whale migration.

 

 

Gray Whales Cruising by Long Beach, WA

January 23rd, 2014 by Susie Goldsmith

Seeing and hearing whales always causes an inexplicable joy in me. Humans are fascinated with their fellow mammals. Whales breath air, have hair, are warmblooded and give birth to live offspring that suckle milk from their mothers.  Gray whales range in length from 40-50 feet and can have flukes (tales) that can measure ten feet across. Females are usually larger than males .  The Gray whales weigh 50,000 to 80,000 pounds and can live up to 50 years. They can start growing barnacles even as youngsters.  We’ve seen Grays rubbing their barnacles on the North Jetty at Cape Disappointment State Park in Ilwaco, Washington, 10 minutes from our B&B, Boreas Inn.

On occasion you can see a Gray whale fluke off the Long Beach Peninsula!

On occasion you can see a Gray whale fluke off the Long Beach Peninsula!

Two times each year, the Gray whales cruise by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula.  After spending summers feeding and fattening up in the Arctic waters, the Gray whales head south cruising off the Pacific Coast to the bays in Southern California and Baja, Mexico.  You can witness this migration starting in mid-December and it peaks in early January and can usually be seen into early February.

When Gray whales are cruising by the Long Beach Peninsula, whether heading north or south, the whale’s goal is to get where they are going and generally they do not hang around and feed–except for maybe some shrimp-like creatures and a fish or two.  In fact, they are known to go without food for 3 to 5 months, which is why they must fatten up when in the rich Arctic waters before heading south to play in Baja.  While in Baja, the whales mate and nurse their young. The gestation period for Grays is 11-13 months.  When nursing, Gray whale moms can produce up to 50 gallons of milk daily containing over 50% fat. Calves can gain 60-70 pounds a day and build up their blubber quite quickly.

The Grays begin their return journey back north to the Arctic from Baja starting in mid-March. The immature whales, adult males and females without offspring head north first cruising by our coast in March and April. Then later, females with calves head north at a slower rate, passing the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula in May.  So there is the possibility of seeing whales on and off for about six months of the year. We have seen gray whales in the surf-line from the lookout on Loop 100 in September leading us to believe that some Gray whales must be hanging out on the Washington coast much of the year.  So maybe there are now “home” pods of Gray whales.

The best spots here to watch for whales is from the North Head Lighthouse and the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center at Cape Disappointment State Park, a 10 minute drive from Boreas Inn.  The whales can spout up to 15 feet in the air through their two blowholes, so that is often what we see when we watch for whales at the Park.  When we have gray skies, the whales water and skies are fairly close in color so the spouting is sometimes all you can see.  Bring your binoculars or borrow ours–there’s no guarantee you will see Gray whales, but it is fun to look.  With the fabulous weather we’ve been having all fall and winter, this is a great activity on the Long Beach Peninsula! It’s much easier to see gray whales when there is blue sky!

This is more likely what you will see--the spout! Thrilling!

This is more likely what you will see–the spout! Thrilling!

Sunny in January for MLK’s Birthday Weekend!

January 15th, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

Sometimes the weather is ridiculous.  Friends call from Portland, yesterday saying it was snowing, today it was foggy there just as it was in Seattle.  Today’s dawn, on the prettiest beach in Washington State, was full of crystal clear sunshine–it “heated up” to 55!  It stayed that way all day, while inland, the fog persisted and the stagnant air advisories made the news.  We realize that 55 isn’t toasty–but it’s certainly warmer than inland.  So we are indeed blessed, this January, with perfect beach walking weather and our loaner bicycles are yearning for a guest to give them exercise.  The Kite Museum and the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum have fabulous exhibits right now, Cape Disappointment State Park is sparkling in the sunshine and who knows, the whales might be swimming by!  The North Head lighthouse is a great place to look for whales as well as the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center way up high on the bluff overlooking the Mouth of the Columbia River.  Or you can just stare out to sea and watch the seabirds and the waves and the crabbing boats dotted all over the sea. The fresh Rock Fish at the 42nd Street Cafe (with their new floor!) is melt in your mouth good and The Depot and Pelicano are always cooking up the freshest fish, oysters and clams. Oh yes, and the steaks…  Football, minus our Seahawks, will be blasting away on the now seven big screens this weekend at The Lost Roo, home of our favorite nachos.  Monday is January 21st, Martin Luther King’s birthday, and the weather report is for beautiful weather well into next week.  How fortunate are we to be living in such a place with so much to do even in the “dead of winter”, with our temporary, but treasured sunshine. Boreas Inn has rooms for you!  $50 gift certificate a The Depot for the next three night reservation this weekend!

Glorious Sunsets on Long Beach

We have the gift of unmatched sunsets at the Inn

Let the sunshine in!

Let the sunshine in!

Spring Whale Watching on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula

February 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling, they say it’s the longest migration of  any mammal up to .

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling.

This extensive gray whale migration all the way to Baja for such a brief stay reminds me of our several family trips during spring vacation when we would drive from Lake Oswego, near Portland all the way to Ensenada, in Baja California.  It’s a long drive in a station wagon with parents and two domineering older brothers for a very brief stay in Baja.  Of course, stopping at Disneyland and in San Diego were nice distractions away from the back seat of a Plymouth station wagon.  We’d spend a few days in Baja and then turn around and drive back to Portland.  Our family migration from Portland to Baja does have a vague but humorous similarity to the gray whales’.  The gray whales tend to breed and nurse their youngsters while in the warmer waters which certainly was not our goal while in Baja.

Our favorite place to watch for the gray whales is in Cape Disappointment State Park at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center and the North Head Lighthouse.  From December until early February, we have seen the grays migrating south and then again in March, April and May when they return to the arctic.  That being said, we have seen gray whales in September just off the surf line from the stunning turnout on the Loop 100 in Cape D State Park.  There are some “permanent” gray whales living off the Washington Coast.  Just over a month ago a half dozen gigantic blue whales were spotted not far off the Long Beach Peninsula, perhaps 30 miles.  They were over 100 feet long!  Fishermen report in one day of summer fishing, seeing three or four varieties of whales including sperm whales and humpbacks or “humpies” off our coast.

Grays feed mostly on crustaceans which it eats by turning on its side (usually the right, resulting in loss of eyesight in the right eye for many older animals) and it scoops up sediments from the sea floor.  They eat by using their baleens which act like a sieve, to capture small sea animals, taken in along with sand, water and other materials they scoop up.  They feed in arctic waters during the summer and sometimes feed during its migration but mostly, when heading south, they rely on their fat reserves.  We have seen them seemingly rubbing themselves on the North Jetty near our favorite spot in the Cape D State Park.   They were feeding by scraping the rocks on the jetty.  So cool!

During migration, these giant cruisers average around 75 miles per day at an average speed of 5 mph.  The round trip of 9,900–14,000 miles is supposedly the longest annual migration of any mammal.  By late December to early January, they begin to arrive in the calving lagoons of Baja. Gestation for grays is 13.5 months so often mothers give birth in the safer waters of Baja and single females are seeking mates.  By mid-February to mid-March the whales have arrived in the lagoons and are nursing, calving and mating.

Throughout February and March, the first to leave the lagoons are males and females without new calves. Pregnant females and nursing mothers with their newborns are the last to depart, leaving only when their calves are ready for the journey, which is usually from late March to mid-April. Sometimes the mothers with new calves linger in warm waters into May.

A population of about 200 gray whales stay along the eastern Pacific coast from Canada to California throughout the summer which is why we occasionally see them in non-migration months.  They never leave to go to Alaskan waters. This summer resident group is known as the Pacific Coast Feeding Group.

Now that you know all about gray whales, drive to the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula to try to get a glimpse.  Right now you might see a few stragglers heading south and in a month or so you will see the gray whales returning from their brief stay in the warmer waters off the Baja Peninsula.  At Boreas Inn, we always have binoculars for you to borrow and helpful hints (Bill is great at spotting whales). During the busier times of migration, there are experts at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Cape D. State Park, just 10 minutes from Boreas Inn.

This is a perfect time of year to take your Valentine to the beach to watch for whales and sleep in the Boreas Inn’s lovely beds, dine by the fire on the best three-course B&B breakfast you’ve ever had, breathe the cool ocean breezes, be lulled by the gentle sound of the Pacific Ocean lapping on the beach and to relax.  Let your innkeepers, Susie Goldsmith and Bill Verner design your time away with great dinners at The Depot, Pelicano, the 42nd Street Cafe, The Lost Roo and Shelburne’s dining room and maybe an in-room massage!  Check our online specials or give us a call at 888-642-8069. We hope to see you soon!

 

 

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