Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The North Head Lighthouse Celebrates 115 Years This Weekend

June 7th, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

At Cape Disappointment State Park, a few miles down the road from Boreas Inn, in Ilwaco, Washington, there are two lighthouses, both enchanting, rugged and enduring, The North Head and Cape Disappointment Lighthouses.  Lighthouses are among our favorite buildings–hardy, yet vulnerable to the hurricane force winds we infrequently have along with those driving rains we frequently experience.  The lights project about 20 miles to the Pacific Ocean to guide vessels into the proper channel and hopefully away from the deadly rocks and spits  of the mighty and fearsome Mouth of the Columbia River. 2,000 vessels have sunk and many have died at the “Mouth” and along the Long Beach Peninsula; more disasters than the infamous Cape Horn!

As a child, my father would take our Lake Oswego, OR 16 foot waterski boat over the Mouth of the Columbia during larger than logical seas in an attempt, I believe to drown the family.  (Just kiddin’–sort of…) The waves instilled a life-long fear into this sea-loving woman.  I still have dreams about my father sitting atop the seat of our ski boat crying “Wahoo! Wahoo!” as waves crashed over us.  We bailed and bailed to keep from sinking.  The Coast Guard would shudder, I’m sure, whenever they saw my father, who occasionally needed towing over the Bar.  (I was not there for that–I would have been mortified!) I remember seeing the lighthouse beams during foggy times at sea and they were oddly, a comfort, while I tried to be brave…with my father.

That aside, this weekend, on Saturday, June 8th, there will be a long-awaited title transfer ceremony of the North Head Lighthouse from the US Coast Guard to Washington State Parks.  There will be lighthouse tours, open houses at the innkeeper’s residences and refreshments. The views are stunning, whales may be sighted, and a good time should be had by all.  So come visit the North Head Lighthouse on the SW Washington Coast, near Long Beach, Washington and celebrate 115 years of maritime history at the North Head Lighthouse at Cape Disappointment State Park.  If you’re lucky, you might snag the last room open at Boreas Bed & Breakfast Inn!

The North Head celebrates 115 of guarding the Mouth of the Columbia.

The North Head celebrates 115 of guarding the Mouth of the Columbia.

Spring Weather at the Beach, Serious Pizza & Huge Waves at Cape Disappointment

April 13th, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

It’s a wild weather day in Long Beach, Washington at Boreas Inn !  Our friends Bud and Michelle Bluett and daughter Clarissa drove 1,100 miles from Saskatchewan, Canada for a long weekend at the Inn and so to celebrate, we journeyed a few miles south to Cape Disappointment State Park in Ilwaco, WA to dine at Serious Pizza owned by our friends Jim and Chi.  They recently took over the store at Cape D State Park and converted it into the finest cafe featuring not only their amazing wood-fired pizza (try The Boreas pizza), but now gourmet salads, sandwiches, home made ice cream–the menu is huge and everything was delicious.  It was so good to be “home” again with Jim and Chi and Serious Pizza at the Park!

Then we took in the sights at our favorite place of places, Waikiki Beach at Cape D. The huge waves rolled into the rocks and the receding waves crashed into the oncoming in a convergence zone of spectacular splashy proportions!  It was a photographer’s dream and Michelle filled up her camera with great shots.  I took one that I like and posted to Facebook.  We ended up at Pickled Fish drinking fresh cranberry lemonade (really puckery–needed some simple syrup for the simple taste buds to un-pucker!) and house-made blue potato chips with chili salt and onion dip. Yum! The view of the surf was stupendous from there also.

So for a busy weekend at Boreas Inn, we actually were able to take a couple of very relaxing hours off with the Bluetts, who head back home on their 1,100 mile round trip tomorrow morning.  A very long weekend indeed.  We are grateful for great guests who have become dear friends!

Bud and Michelle Bluett at the Beard's Hollow Overlook on 4-13-13. A Wild Weather Day on the Long Beach Peninsula!

Bud and Michelle Bluett at the Beard’s Hollow Overlook on 4-13-13. A Wild Weather Day on the Long Beach Peninsula!

Our favorite Waikiki Beach at Cape Disappointment State Park with the Wild Waves today!

Our favorite Waikiki Beach at Cape Disappointment State Park with the Wild Waves today!

Razor Clam Festival in Long Beach, Washington April 27 & 28, 2013

March 31st, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

Are you looking for something absolutely unique to do April 26th -28th? Come to the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival! Oh the nostalgia!  My earliest memories of clam digging on the Long Beach Peninsula, when I was a toddler, were of cold, bare wet feet, soon to be numb, in the early morning. Out on the wide beach, in the wet sand, with my parents and two older brothers,  I trotted around looking for dimples in the sand.  “There’s one, Dad! There’s one, Mom!”  I was too little to dig.  My brothers had clam guns.  We got a gazillion clams and then, the inevitable. We had to clean the clams.  I was too little, for years, to touch a knife, and if you know me now, sometimes I am still too little to touch a knife!  But I had to rinse the clean clams free of sand under the cold tap water in the clam cleaning rooms at whichever old motels we stayed in.  My frozen fingers now matched my frozen, wet sandy feet! In the Boulevard Motel or The Lighthouse Motel…wherever our family could stay, the clam-cleaning rooms smelled the same–salty, slightly musty, very damp.  Back then, we could dig all the clams we wanted. So we would clean then for what seemed to me like hours. So the razor clams we loved so much would be ground up and made into clam chowder.  I turned the crank of the old food grinder–I still have one. I was never too little to grind clams.  The razors made the best clam chowder in the world and my dad always took all the credit.  The fried clams he produced were always considered a  huge treat–way back then.  I remember Long Beach’s World’s Largest Frying Pan being used for frying clams.  It was clearly a good time.

Well- the GOOD TIMES ARE BACK!  They say 20,ooo people came to the 2nd Razor Clam Festival in 1941!  The last Razor Clam Festival was, we think, in 1968.  Well it’s BACK!  The first Razor Clam Festival in around 45 years will happen in Long Beach, WA on April 27 and 28 this year!  This event brings back such sweet childhood memories for me and perhaps it will be a new memory for you.

So who is the genius who re-created the The Long Beach Razor Clam Festival?  Well, Randy Dennis of The Dennis Company, who happens to be one of the State’s most inventive, entrepreneurial, forward thinking and nicest guys we will ever know!  Events of the Festival include:

Clam Festival Court–Francis O’Neil was the “Clam Festival Bathing Beauty” in 1948–the QUEEN of the court will be here to re-start the tradition!

Razor Clam Digging Lessons- You have to pre-register for Saturday and Sunday morning lessons in front of The Breakers Hotel.

WA Department of Fish & Wildlife will judge “Biggest Clam Dug” and “Best Looking Limit” for $100 prizes!

Chowder Cook-Off–Local restaurants will compete for “Best Chowder” Trophy accompanied by music from the North Coast Blues band.

There will be Tummy Warmer Stations at the Pavillion at the foot of the Bolstad Beach Approach with cookies, hot cocoa, coffee & tea.

Vintage Clam Festival postcards, t-shirts, mugs, magnets, the Official Razor Clam Festival Poster by Don Nesbitt and other swag will be available!

There will be street entertainment by Dennis Duck, the Beard’s Hollow Pirates and Queen L DeDa’s Mermaids downtown on Saturday!

There will be clam supplies, weather gear and more available at the Dennis Company in Long Beach on both days.

A Clam Gun Decorating Contest is being held at the local elementary schools, the Long Beach Boys & Girls Club with public voting.

This photo courtesy of Wayne O'Neil collection! This is the 1948 Clam Festival Court!

This photo courtesy of Wayne O’Neil collection! This is the 1948 Clam Festival Court!

So where will you stay for this grand occasion on the weekend of April 26th?  Currently there are openings at beautiful Boreas Inn, just a few short blocks from this much anticipated event!  You can re-warm your frozen tootsies and laze around after your invigorating participation in this historic event–the Razor Clam Festival in downtown Long Beach, WA!

So if you’re thinking of coming to this really fabulous event, make your reservations now!!!

 

No Pining over the Old Pine Tree — Spring Cleaning the Trees at Boreas Inn

March 12th, 2013 by Susie Goldsmith

We’ve seen a huge change today outside our front door!  At long last, there was Spring cleaning on the outside of Boreas Inn!  And we’re not pining over the loss. Our front courtyard contained this big old Austrian pine tree that had grown so tall and become ungainly.  We were afraid it would topple over.  In 1996, when we moved in, it was a pretty pine tree, planted with the best of intentions–but after growing another 30 feet high, it was dropping needles by the buckets and made winter darker in the courtyard.  It was dying…. Today, Arbor Care Tree Specialists from Astoria so very carefully took the tree down in tiny pieces with the work done so perfectly by Jon Fagerland, a brilliantly talented musician from The Holiday Friends Band who’s also a brilliantly talented arborist. There were power lines, cable lines, phone lines and nary a line was nicked.  Ropes and gentle chainsaw work made the removal of our pine look like a tree falling ballet.  We highly recommend Arbor Care Tree Specialists! They left the property without even a tiny bit of a mess.  While they cleaned as the limbs fell or were lowered to the ground, you would have never known what a disaster it was before they commenced the chipping and clean-up.  Many thanks also to Bernie from our local PUD#2 in Long Beach. He disconnected and reconnected the power lines and while here, topped three trees in our parking lot that were playing close to the  lines.  After the tree was down, Ed Strange of Strange Landscape (love that name!) brought over five potted golden bamboo plants which beautifully screens us from the $#@%&  house next door. The courtyard, the kitchen and Hideaway room are now much lighter and brighter. With the courtyard greening up for spring, the early morning sunshine will make for very pretty colors!  Only a little shade will remain.  All of this happened in seven hours!  Now all we have to do is pay for it.  Thanks to everyone for tolerating us on Facebook today. For some reason, this was an emotional experience.

We do have vacancies this weekend at Boreas Inn if you want a simple, luxurious, restful, food-filled weekend at the beautiful beach.  Maybe you will be able to see the Comet PanSTARRS if the skies clear.  If indeed we clear up at the beach, there is a great view of the comet with no city lights!

Now minus that big old pine tree!

Now minus that big old pine tree!

The “Real” Santa Visits Boreas Inn -Long Beach, WA

December 20th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

It has never happened before.  A guest merely emerges from their bedroom for breakfast and the innkeepers are speechless and their eyes fill with tears.  These tears were of surprise and joy.  With almost a child-like wonder–our eyes must have been huge–two adults became children once again. On December 25, 2011, our only guests at Boreas Inn for Christmas morning were Lindley and Charlotte Mixon from Raymond, WA.  When they came in the front door, it did occur to us that he was a lovely older gentleman with a white beard and how ironic that it was Christmas Eve.  Being polite, we said not a word about the resemblance.  We were sure he’d heard it before. 

But only when he emerged from his room on Christmas morning for breakfast, did we truly hold our breath and respond with actual childhood glee that we were in the presence of Santa and Mrs. Claus.  Lindley was dressed in a red shirt, with suspenders holding up his trousers, and had a red hat on his head trimmed with white fur.  My first words to him were, “My goodness, Santa, you must be exhausted and very hungry! Did you have a busy night?”  Yes, this Jewish girl did say that…couldn’t help it.  Lindley responded that yes, it was a tiring night but he had a good rest and was very hungry indeed.   We posed in front of the Boreas Inn tree with Mrs. Claus, Charlotte, and I couldn’t resist a shot giving Santa a kiss.  Lindley has never played Santa professionally! Bill and I were truly moved by Lindley and Charlotte.  Lindley is an artist, a warm, loving man with phenomenal talent for throwing big pots and painting.  He is currently recovering nicely from open heart surgery.  So, sadly, Santa and Mrs. Claus won’t be with us this Christmas. We will miss them and keep in touch on Facebook. We will forever remember the wonderful holiday gift they gave to us a year ago.  The richness of life in our 16 years as innkeepers never fails to reward, surprise and enrich us.  Thank you, Lindley and Charlotte, for your friendship.  Take it easy this Christmas, Lindley! Get healthy and come back soon.

On Christmas morning, 2011, Lindley Mixon and his wife Charlotte, emerged from The Dunes Suite at Boreas Inn and really, truly Susie and Bill were with Santa and Mrs. Claus!

Sunny Skies for the 4th of July in Long Beach, Washington

June 30th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Pat Brown, weather anchor at ABC affiliate KGTV in San Diego stayed at Boreas a few weeks ago and we did not make her predict our weather!

We’re about to embark on July.   We can’t often brag about the Long Beach Peninsula being “hot fun in the summertime” as the song goes… but warm fun in the summertime is more like it!  The weather has been a big tease this spring and summer.  Beautiful warm days with clear skies and stunning sunsets…and then we wake up to murky skies.  Last night on Portland’s KATU weather, the prediction was for a rainy few days over the 4th of July. Today on KATU weather, the prediction is for clearing on Sunday and then an unbelievably long stretch of sunny skies.  How can the predictions change so quickly from those gloomy cloud weather icons with “rain” streaking south out of them like little silver needles to endless golden orbs crossed by a cute little stripe of “cloud” for 10 days straight?  How does a weather prediction change that radically that quickly??

Those who know me at all, understand that I am a fantasy meteorologist.  My avocation is weather and I am forever searching for forecasts and have become pretty good at predicting weather where I live.  I tend to be overly optimistic at times, however, which in the Pacific Northwest, is an OK virtue.  I constantly tell guests that the skies are going to clear, and based upon the barometric pressure, I am often correct. But I’m also often wrong. Northwest weather is tough to predict.  My biggest beef is that Portland and Seattle weather forecasters are so often incorrect in weather predictions for the coast, if that is, they even recall that the Long Beach Peninsula exists. These professionals don’t understand that when they are so wrong about the weather and predict rain, that visitors do not come to the beach and resort areas dependent upon visitors suffer from the inaccurate predictions. They should just call us on the phone and ASK us how our weather is before they blow it!

Speaking of “weather people”, we were tickled to have San Diego’s KGTV weather anchor Pat Brown and one of her best friends stay with us at Boreas Inn a few weeks ago.  They were so much fun!  I told her my fantasy about being a weather woman and she just smiled at me and said “really?”  Yes, really!!  Except here, being a weather forecaster requires being part omniscient and part snake oil salesman, able to easily slide from a rather dire prediction (if you like sun) to the complete opposite forecast quickly, articulately, without seeming to lose credibility, like last night’s’ forecast compared to this morning’s.  Very slippery, right?  Another down side of being a weather anchor she was saying is that you become known to everyone in their local area which makes it hard to go out of your house to do anything with out being recognized.   So being here was nice for her–she had some privacy to just be herself.  Until she went to Serious Pizza at Cape D State Park, where there was a family from San Diego…who recognized her!

Weather forecasters in the Pacific NW spend a lot of time being on the “Storm Team” when one snow flake is seen or one gust of wind exceeds 25.  “Storm Team Coverage” lasts for days sometimes and requires everyone to have their “Storm Team” parka’s and their “Storm Team” baseball caps and forces them to stand on cold bridges and overpasses getting spattered by passing cars as they “cover the storm.”  Yes, I now know that being on the “Storm Team” is not what it’s cracked up to be and can be totally exhausting both for the viewer and the brave forecaster on that cold windy “Sylvan Hill Overpass.”

Enough of my weather rant.  We are currently looking for a predicted long-ish stretch  of beautiful weather on the Long Beach Peninsula. The 4th of July and the next 10 days looks to be great, and Boreas Inn has rooms for you and magical breakfast cuisine. The Depot, Pelicano, Nanci and Jimella’s Market Cafe, the 42nd Street Cafe and the Lost Roo will provide luscious seafood, steaks and other local farm to table treats for your palate when you become hungry once again.  And don’t forget Serious Pizza! We just tried their tequila ice cream tonight after our wood-fired steamer clams and pizza.  Yum!

4th of July is Wild and Crazy in Long Beach, Washington

June 26th, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

If you like 4th of July fireworks running continuously on 28 miles of beach, Long Beach is your spot!  Boreas Inn, Trip Advisor’s #1 B&B in the area still has some room for you to stay that even have a view of the fireworks! While the City of Long Beach fireworks display is terrific, it is often hard to tell which set of fireworks is the “official” display and which ones are the hundreds of private displays that run along the “World’s Longest Beach” in the very furthest Southwest corner of Washington State, where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. If you miss the Long Beach displays on the 4th, the Port of Ilwaco has a simply beautiful display over the Port on Saturday on July 7th!

Pyrotechnics is a rampant art form here in Long Beach, Washington, and for those who cannot get enough of the gigantic sparklers that abound on the 4th of July around the USA, the Long Beach Peninsula will give you the thrill you seek!  We promise!  We only ask that if you pack it in, you pack it out.  The Grass Roots Garbage Gang will be handing out garbage bags to all who come to the beach to play on the 4th of July and will then be conducting their post-4th clean-up starting at 9 a.m. on July 5th.  If you’d like to help, just show up on the beach approaches on the Peninsula on the 5th of July!  And who knows, maybe you will score some amazing Japanese tsunami find, like a rusted Harley complete with its crate, or maybe even the kitchen sink.  It’s sad but true.

Come to Long Beach, WA for the Best Fireworks in the Country!

The City of Long Beach has dumpsters for the tsunami junk, particularly the styrofoam that is floating in. So please come help with that!

Sunny Days This Weekend–Great for Clamming!

March 22nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

Clamming at Beard's Hollow

This weekend looks to be lovely with sunshine!  The Long Beach Peninsula has early morning clam tides Saturday and Sunday so you can limit and be back in time for a warm hot tub and our signature breakfast by the fireplace at 9:30.  All of our friends have reported limiting quickly during the last clam dig–so maybe you can too!  Of course,  you don’t have to dig clams –or else send the sweetheart out to dig clams while you sleep in could be a plan too! Simply languishing in Boreas Inn’s fluffy feather beds in our oceanside Long Beach, WA lodging will make your weekend divine. We will set up dinners out in our favorite haunts.  Whether you clam or not, you will dig it at Boreas!

Spring Whale Watching on the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula

February 2nd, 2012 by Susie Goldsmith

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling, they say it’s the longest migration of  any mammal up to .

The gray whale is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds every year passing by the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula during the southern and northern migrations.  Gray whales can reach a length of 52 ft and can weigh about 35 tons and live a very long time, 50–70 years!  They are called “Gray” because they have gray patches and white mottling on dark skin and descend from filter-feeding whales that developed over 30 million years ago.

When the arctic ice starts to form, the grays whales start a two- to three-month trip south to the Baja Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico.  Around 19,000 whales migrate by the Long Beach Peninsula on their way to warmer waters and then a couple of months later, they cruise by again heading back north.  So they really don’t have a lot of vacation time for all that traveling.

This extensive gray whale migration all the way to Baja for such a brief stay reminds me of our several family trips during spring vacation when we would drive from Lake Oswego, near Portland all the way to Ensenada, in Baja California.  It’s a long drive in a station wagon with parents and two domineering older brothers for a very brief stay in Baja.  Of course, stopping at Disneyland and in San Diego were nice distractions away from the back seat of a Plymouth station wagon.  We’d spend a few days in Baja and then turn around and drive back to Portland.  Our family migration from Portland to Baja does have a vague but humorous similarity to the gray whales’.  The gray whales tend to breed and nurse their youngsters while in the warmer waters which certainly was not our goal while in Baja.

Our favorite place to watch for the gray whales is in Cape Disappointment State Park at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center and the North Head Lighthouse.  From December until early February, we have seen the grays migrating south and then again in March, April and May when they return to the arctic.  That being said, we have seen gray whales in September just off the surf line from the stunning turnout on the Loop 100 in Cape D State Park.  There are some “permanent” gray whales living off the Washington Coast.  Just over a month ago a half dozen gigantic blue whales were spotted not far off the Long Beach Peninsula, perhaps 30 miles.  They were over 100 feet long!  Fishermen report in one day of summer fishing, seeing three or four varieties of whales including sperm whales and humpbacks or “humpies” off our coast.

Grays feed mostly on crustaceans which it eats by turning on its side (usually the right, resulting in loss of eyesight in the right eye for many older animals) and it scoops up sediments from the sea floor.  They eat by using their baleens which act like a sieve, to capture small sea animals, taken in along with sand, water and other materials they scoop up.  They feed in arctic waters during the summer and sometimes feed during its migration but mostly, when heading south, they rely on their fat reserves.  We have seen them seemingly rubbing themselves on the North Jetty near our favorite spot in the Cape D State Park.   They were feeding by scraping the rocks on the jetty.  So cool!

During migration, these giant cruisers average around 75 miles per day at an average speed of 5 mph.  The round trip of 9,900–14,000 miles is supposedly the longest annual migration of any mammal.  By late December to early January, they begin to arrive in the calving lagoons of Baja. Gestation for grays is 13.5 months so often mothers give birth in the safer waters of Baja and single females are seeking mates.  By mid-February to mid-March the whales have arrived in the lagoons and are nursing, calving and mating.

Throughout February and March, the first to leave the lagoons are males and females without new calves. Pregnant females and nursing mothers with their newborns are the last to depart, leaving only when their calves are ready for the journey, which is usually from late March to mid-April. Sometimes the mothers with new calves linger in warm waters into May.

A population of about 200 gray whales stay along the eastern Pacific coast from Canada to California throughout the summer which is why we occasionally see them in non-migration months.  They never leave to go to Alaskan waters. This summer resident group is known as the Pacific Coast Feeding Group.

Now that you know all about gray whales, drive to the Long Beach, Washington Peninsula to try to get a glimpse.  Right now you might see a few stragglers heading south and in a month or so you will see the gray whales returning from their brief stay in the warmer waters off the Baja Peninsula.  At Boreas Inn, we always have binoculars for you to borrow and helpful hints (Bill is great at spotting whales). During the busier times of migration, there are experts at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Cape D. State Park, just 10 minutes from Boreas Inn.

This is a perfect time of year to take your Valentine to the beach to watch for whales and sleep in the Boreas Inn’s lovely beds, dine by the fire on the best three-course B&B breakfast you’ve ever had, breathe the cool ocean breezes, be lulled by the gentle sound of the Pacific Ocean lapping on the beach and to relax.  Let your innkeepers, Susie Goldsmith and Bill Verner design your time away with great dinners at The Depot, Pelicano, the 42nd Street Cafe, The Lost Roo and Shelburne’s dining room and maybe an in-room massage!  Check our online specials or give us a call at 888-642-8069. We hope to see you soon!

 

 

Boreas Inn’s Wild Mushroom and Sausage Gravy with Buttery Chive Biscuits

November 10th, 2011 by Susie Goldsmith

This is Susie’s favorite side-dish.  That’s right….there’s more! We often harvest the Porcini (King Boletus) Mushrooms within feet of the inn.  When Bill is not out tromping around in the dunes foraging, we have two professional foragers supplying us with our local wild mushrooms in addition to other bounty from the area.   Boreas Inn sits in the primary sand dunes next to the Pacific Ocean in historic Long Beach, Washington.  Noted for fine breakfast dining, ocean views, the most luxurious beds for a dreamy nights’ sleep and beautiful surroundings, this Long Beach Washington Bed and Breakfast has class without pretense!

Gravy:

Wild Mushroom and Sausage Gravy
  • 1/2 pound bulk pork sausage
  • 3/4 pound wild mushrooms, brushed clean, trimmed and coarsely chopped * (see note)
  • 1/4 cup minced onion
  • 1/4cup flour
  • 2 tablespoons fresh minced chive
  • 2 cups half-and-half or milk
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons sherry (optional)

Biscuits:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter cut into pieces
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons fresh minced chives

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly butter (or spray) a heavy baking sheet. For the biscuits, combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a food processor and pulse a couple of times to blend. Add the butter and pulse until it’s finely chopped and mixture has the consistency of coarse cornmeal. (You can also cut the butter into the flour mixture with a pastry blender or two knives.). Transfer the mixture to a bowl, add the milk and chives and stir until the batter is evenly mixed–or keep the ingredients in the processor and very gently pulse. Don’t over-mix or you will have tough, heavy biscuits!

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface. Press the dough into a circle about six inches across and one inch thick. Cut the dough into quarters, setting the biscuits on the baking sheet with one inch or so between them. Bake the biscuits until they are puffed and lightly brown on top, 12-15 minutes. Transfer them to a rack to cool.

Cook the sausage in a large skillet over medium heat until cooked through and lightly browned, 12-15 minutes. Stir often and break up the sausage chunks as they cook. Spoon out and discard excess fat. Add the mushrooms and onion; increase heat to medium-high and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are tender and any liquid they give off is evaporated, 5-7 minutes. Add the four and cook for 1-2 minutes longer, stirring so that the flour evenly coats the sausage and mushrooms. Slowly stir in the milk or half and half and cook until the gravy has thickened, 5-7 minutes. Stir in the chives and season to taste with salt and pepper.  Add the sherry just before serving.

To serve, cut each of the biscuits in half horizontally and set the bottom halves on the individual plates. Generously spoon the mushroom-sausage gravy over, top with the top of the biscuit.  Sprinkle with paprika and garnish the plate with fresh herbs or edible flowers. Makes 4 servings.

*I prefer to use 1/2 pound dried porcini mushrooms reconstituted in a cup or so of water. Drain the mushrooms and save the liquid. Make the wild mushroom and sausage gravy the night before and then use the saved liquid to thin the gravy prior to heating and serving. The liquid adds more depth to the wild mushroom flavor of the dish.  You can double or triple the recipe and freeze.  Freeze extra unbaked biscuits and bake as needed. Delicious!

TripAdvisor.com // BedandBreakfast.com

Back to top ↑ | Sitemap | Log in | Website Designed and Developed by InsideOut Solutions

»